Unjustified extrapolation

Unjustified extrapolation Letter to the editor on:Rabey, M; Smith, A; Beales, D; Slater, H; O’Sullivan, P. (2017). Pain provocation following sagittal plane repeated movements in people with chronic low back pain. Associations with pain sensitivity and psychological profiles. In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain 16, S22–28. doi:10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.01.009.We would like to thank the authors of the article ‘Pain provocation following sagittal plane repeated movements in people with chronic low back pain: Associations with pain sensitivity and psychological profiles’ [1] for attempting to further explore the use and value of patient generated repeated movements in the assessment of low back pain patients. We agree that pain provocative responses from repeated movement testing for patients with low back pain impairments can enhance estimates of the patients’ likelihood of a good or poor rehabilitation outcome and guide treatment decisions regarding exercise prescription during the episode of care. Many well designed observational studies and clinical trials have reported on this capacity [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]. The article has the potential to elaborate on the relationship between provocative pain responses following repeated movements in people with back pain. However, for the reasons outlined below, we feel that the article does not fulfil this potential and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Unjustified extrapolation

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.03.008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Letter to the editor on:Rabey, M; Smith, A; Beales, D; Slater, H; O’Sullivan, P. (2017). Pain provocation following sagittal plane repeated movements in people with chronic low back pain. Associations with pain sensitivity and psychological profiles. In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain 16, S22–28. doi:10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.01.009.We would like to thank the authors of the article ‘Pain provocation following sagittal plane repeated movements in people with chronic low back pain: Associations with pain sensitivity and psychological profiles’ [1] for attempting to further explore the use and value of patient generated repeated movements in the assessment of low back pain patients. We agree that pain provocative responses from repeated movement testing for patients with low back pain impairments can enhance estimates of the patients’ likelihood of a good or poor rehabilitation outcome and guide treatment decisions regarding exercise prescription during the episode of care. Many well designed observational studies and clinical trials have reported on this capacity [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]. The article has the potential to elaborate on the relationship between provocative pain responses following repeated movements in people with back pain. However, for the reasons outlined below, we feel that the article does not fulfil this potential and

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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