Translation of strategic ambiguity: A relevance-theoretic analysis

Translation of strategic ambiguity: A relevance-theoretic analysis AbstractThe purpose of our current research is to see how Relevance Theory can handle one specific translation problem, namely strategic ambiguous structures. Concisely, we aim to provide a conceptual framework as to how the translator should cope with a pervasive ambiguity problem at the discoursal level. The point of departure from probably all previous models of analysis is that a relevance-theoretic analysis would, we believe, require that a “good” translation be not the one that represents an interpretation of the text, but the one which leaves the door open for all interpretations which the original text provides evidence for. Hence, the role of translator is not to ‘interpret’ but to ‘translate’. If this is true, ambiguity resolution should not be a viable alternative. In other words, what the translator should do is empower the audience with all it takes to let them work out all the explicatures (linguistically inferred meanings) and entertain themselves with the implicatures (contextually inferred meanings) of the original. Direct Translation, along the lines laid down by Gutt (1991/2000), is the method of translation which can, we believe, bring about the desired results because “it tries to provide readers with contextual information that enables them to draw their own inferences” (Smith 2000: 92). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Poznan Studies in Contemporary Linguistics de Gruyter

Translation of strategic ambiguity: A relevance-theoretic analysis

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2018 Faculty of English, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
ISSN
1897-7499
eISSN
1897-7499
D.O.I.
10.1515/psicl-2018-0001
Publisher site
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Abstract

AbstractThe purpose of our current research is to see how Relevance Theory can handle one specific translation problem, namely strategic ambiguous structures. Concisely, we aim to provide a conceptual framework as to how the translator should cope with a pervasive ambiguity problem at the discoursal level. The point of departure from probably all previous models of analysis is that a relevance-theoretic analysis would, we believe, require that a “good” translation be not the one that represents an interpretation of the text, but the one which leaves the door open for all interpretations which the original text provides evidence for. Hence, the role of translator is not to ‘interpret’ but to ‘translate’. If this is true, ambiguity resolution should not be a viable alternative. In other words, what the translator should do is empower the audience with all it takes to let them work out all the explicatures (linguistically inferred meanings) and entertain themselves with the implicatures (contextually inferred meanings) of the original. Direct Translation, along the lines laid down by Gutt (1991/2000), is the method of translation which can, we believe, bring about the desired results because “it tries to provide readers with contextual information that enables them to draw their own inferences” (Smith 2000: 92).

Journal

Poznan Studies in Contemporary Linguisticsde Gruyter

Published: Mar 26, 2018

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