Towards a structured examination of contextual flexibility in persistent pain

Towards a structured examination of contextual flexibility in persistent pain In this edition of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Ida Flink and her colleagues validate a new questionnaire measuring context insensitivity [1]. Their findings show that the sub-scale of context insensitive avoidance was the only one to reach criterion and construct validity, however this still is a highly interesting questionnaire. It is a first step towards a structured measure of adaptation to contextual cues. The term context sensitivity was defined by Steven Linton as “the degree to which a response is in tune with the ever changing demands of the context” [2]. There, it is argued that this concept could provide us with a mechanism explaining the high co-occurrence of pain and emotional distress.1It is all about the contextThe term context insensitivity stems from an ever-growing body of research, which taps into context dependent activation of pain- related behaviour. Alternatively, stated plainly: it is your ability to be flexible in your behaviour depending on cues given by the situation in which you find yourself. Dating back to Skinner and the behaviourists before him, studying contextual cues and how they shape our behaviour, this is by no means novel [3]. However, this line of research has resurged, yielding new potential http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Towards a structured examination of contextual flexibility in persistent pain

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.09.015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this edition of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Ida Flink and her colleagues validate a new questionnaire measuring context insensitivity [1]. Their findings show that the sub-scale of context insensitive avoidance was the only one to reach criterion and construct validity, however this still is a highly interesting questionnaire. It is a first step towards a structured measure of adaptation to contextual cues. The term context sensitivity was defined by Steven Linton as “the degree to which a response is in tune with the ever changing demands of the context” [2]. There, it is argued that this concept could provide us with a mechanism explaining the high co-occurrence of pain and emotional distress.1It is all about the contextThe term context insensitivity stems from an ever-growing body of research, which taps into context dependent activation of pain- related behaviour. Alternatively, stated plainly: it is your ability to be flexible in your behaviour depending on cues given by the situation in which you find yourself. Dating back to Skinner and the behaviourists before him, studying contextual cues and how they shape our behaviour, this is by no means novel [3]. However, this line of research has resurged, yielding new potential

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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