The Survey of Pain Attitudes: A revised version of its pediatric form

The Survey of Pain Attitudes: A revised version of its pediatric form AbstractBackground and aimsValid and reliable measures of patients’ pain beliefs are needed by clinicians and researchers to better understand the efficacy and mechanisms of pain treatments. The objective of this work was to address this need by further developing the pediatric version of the Survey of Pain Attitudes (Peds-SOPA), one of the most commonly used measures of pain beliefs.MethodsA convenience sample of three hundred and seven adolescents (mean age= 14.35; SD = 1.62; 59% girls) participated in the study. They rated the intensity of their worst pain experienced in the 3 months prior to the assessment and completed both the Functional Disability Inventory and a revised version of a pediatric version of the Survey of Pain Attitudes (Peds-SOPA-R).ResultsFactor analyses confirmed a seven-factor solution of the questionnaire, and the revised version demonstrated improvements in the internal consistency of several of the scales (values ranged between adequate and good: 0.71–0.87), except for the Medical Cure scale which showed an internal consistency value of 0.65. The results support the validity of the Peds-SOPA-R scale scores by showing, as predicted, positive relationships between beliefs thought to be maladaptive (e.g., the belief that one is unable to function because of pain) and pain intensity and disability, and negative relationships with beliefs thought to be adaptive (e.g., the belief that exercise is beneficial for pain management) and these criterion variables.ConclusionsThese findings will be helpful to researchers who wish to study the role that pain beliefs play in adjustment to pain in youth.ImplicationsThe results provide critical psychometric information about a revised version of one of the most used questionnaires to assess pain beliefs. The evidence presented will be helpful to researchers who want to study the role that pain beliefs play in adjustment to chronic pain in young people. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

The Survey of Pain Attitudes: A revised version of its pediatric form

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2015 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.11.010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackground and aimsValid and reliable measures of patients’ pain beliefs are needed by clinicians and researchers to better understand the efficacy and mechanisms of pain treatments. The objective of this work was to address this need by further developing the pediatric version of the Survey of Pain Attitudes (Peds-SOPA), one of the most commonly used measures of pain beliefs.MethodsA convenience sample of three hundred and seven adolescents (mean age= 14.35; SD = 1.62; 59% girls) participated in the study. They rated the intensity of their worst pain experienced in the 3 months prior to the assessment and completed both the Functional Disability Inventory and a revised version of a pediatric version of the Survey of Pain Attitudes (Peds-SOPA-R).ResultsFactor analyses confirmed a seven-factor solution of the questionnaire, and the revised version demonstrated improvements in the internal consistency of several of the scales (values ranged between adequate and good: 0.71–0.87), except for the Medical Cure scale which showed an internal consistency value of 0.65. The results support the validity of the Peds-SOPA-R scale scores by showing, as predicted, positive relationships between beliefs thought to be maladaptive (e.g., the belief that one is unable to function because of pain) and pain intensity and disability, and negative relationships with beliefs thought to be adaptive (e.g., the belief that exercise is beneficial for pain management) and these criterion variables.ConclusionsThese findings will be helpful to researchers who wish to study the role that pain beliefs play in adjustment to pain in youth.ImplicationsThe results provide critical psychometric information about a revised version of one of the most used questionnaires to assess pain beliefs. The evidence presented will be helpful to researchers who want to study the role that pain beliefs play in adjustment to chronic pain in young people.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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