The role of social anxiety in chronic pain and the return-to-work process

The role of social anxiety in chronic pain and the return-to-work process In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Johanna Thomten and her coworkers [1] report on the relationship between social anxiety, pain catastrophizing, and the ability to communicate patients pain-related needs at work. The idea of catastrophizing being a common element in both social anxiety and pain is enticing, especially considering the evidence demonstrating how social factors determine the relationship between catastrophizing and pain outcomes [2]. The inclusion of work-related expectancy and communication adds to the novelty of the study and its aims. Work relationships are considered a crucial element in the rehabilitation of low-back pain [3,4], but perhaps not when multidisciplinary treatment is given by specialized pain clinics. This could be due to the existing studies largely being concerned with non-specific and specific low-back pain, but it could also be because hospitals are organized within the health-care sector and communication between stakeholders is time consuming and challenging [5].1Social anxiety outperformed pain catastrophizingResults from the current study showed a moderate correlation between pain catastrophizing, social anxiety (0.39) and pain severity (0.29). Social anxiety on the other hand was only weakly correlated with pain severity, indicating that elements of the social anxiety measure affect pain catastrophizing, but not pain http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

The role of social anxiety in chronic pain and the return-to-work process

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.02.006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Johanna Thomten and her coworkers [1] report on the relationship between social anxiety, pain catastrophizing, and the ability to communicate patients pain-related needs at work. The idea of catastrophizing being a common element in both social anxiety and pain is enticing, especially considering the evidence demonstrating how social factors determine the relationship between catastrophizing and pain outcomes [2]. The inclusion of work-related expectancy and communication adds to the novelty of the study and its aims. Work relationships are considered a crucial element in the rehabilitation of low-back pain [3,4], but perhaps not when multidisciplinary treatment is given by specialized pain clinics. This could be due to the existing studies largely being concerned with non-specific and specific low-back pain, but it could also be because hospitals are organized within the health-care sector and communication between stakeholders is time consuming and challenging [5].1Social anxiety outperformed pain catastrophizingResults from the current study showed a moderate correlation between pain catastrophizing, social anxiety (0.39) and pain severity (0.29). Social anxiety on the other hand was only weakly correlated with pain severity, indicating that elements of the social anxiety measure affect pain catastrophizing, but not pain

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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