The role of catastrophizing in the pain–depression relationship

The role of catastrophizing in the pain–depression relationship In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Wood and coworkers [1] investigate the mediating role of catastrophizing in the relationship between changes in pain intensity and changes in depression in older adults. The study has a prospective design, thereby strengthening the same findings that were previously found by the authors in a cross-sectional design. The article addresses a fairly well studied topic, but in an understudied population. Few previous studies have specifically targeted the elderly population when trying to understand chronic pain mechanisms, despite the fact that there appears to be a difference between younger and older adults when it comes to the prevalence and characterization of comorbid depression in chronic pain [2,3]. The study therefore provides much needed knowledge about a topic with obvious clinical implications. More insight into the mechanisms of pain chronification could contribute to intervention development by guiding which elements to target specifically in treatment.1The unknown nature of the pain-depression relationshipIt has long been known that depression commonly co-occur in patients suffering from chronic pain, but the nature of this relationship is still largely unknown [4]. When it comes to directionality and mediating variables, the scarce literature in study populations of older adults http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

The role of catastrophizing in the pain–depression relationship

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.02.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Wood and coworkers [1] investigate the mediating role of catastrophizing in the relationship between changes in pain intensity and changes in depression in older adults. The study has a prospective design, thereby strengthening the same findings that were previously found by the authors in a cross-sectional design. The article addresses a fairly well studied topic, but in an understudied population. Few previous studies have specifically targeted the elderly population when trying to understand chronic pain mechanisms, despite the fact that there appears to be a difference between younger and older adults when it comes to the prevalence and characterization of comorbid depression in chronic pain [2,3]. The study therefore provides much needed knowledge about a topic with obvious clinical implications. More insight into the mechanisms of pain chronification could contribute to intervention development by guiding which elements to target specifically in treatment.1The unknown nature of the pain-depression relationshipIt has long been known that depression commonly co-occur in patients suffering from chronic pain, but the nature of this relationship is still largely unknown [4]. When it comes to directionality and mediating variables, the scarce literature in study populations of older adults

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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