The obligation to publishing negative outcome data from neuropathic pain clinical trials

The obligation to publishing negative outcome data from neuropathic pain clinical trials In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Jarkko Kalliomäki et al. report a negative trial of a chemochine receptor (CCR2) antagonist in painful diabetic neuropathy [1]. This was a relevant trial performed with appropriate methodology and of high quality.1The importance of publishing well done negative outcome trialsThe researchers should be praised for having taken the initiative to publish the results, and it is even more praiseworthy that the initiative stems from a drug company. The journal deserves to be credited for taking up the responsibility to also publish negative results that may not attract so much attention as do positive trials. Publication of high quality negative trials is extremely important because it may have implications for clinical practice and for research strategies within the field, so the limited resources are used most cost-effectively.Most clinicians will probably strive to pursue an evidence-based pharmacological treatment approach for their patients with neuropathic pain. To do so, it is obvious to consult resources such as guidelines and reviews [2,3,4]. These resources will typically have compiled all the relevant published trials within the field. Based on critical review of the trials, an evidence-based recommendation is given and information on the efficacy to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

The obligation to publishing negative outcome data from neuropathic pain clinical trials

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2012 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2012.11.004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Jarkko Kalliomäki et al. report a negative trial of a chemochine receptor (CCR2) antagonist in painful diabetic neuropathy [1]. This was a relevant trial performed with appropriate methodology and of high quality.1The importance of publishing well done negative outcome trialsThe researchers should be praised for having taken the initiative to publish the results, and it is even more praiseworthy that the initiative stems from a drug company. The journal deserves to be credited for taking up the responsibility to also publish negative results that may not attract so much attention as do positive trials. Publication of high quality negative trials is extremely important because it may have implications for clinical practice and for research strategies within the field, so the limited resources are used most cost-effectively.Most clinicians will probably strive to pursue an evidence-based pharmacological treatment approach for their patients with neuropathic pain. To do so, it is obvious to consult resources such as guidelines and reviews [2,3,4]. These resources will typically have compiled all the relevant published trials within the field. Based on critical review of the trials, an evidence-based recommendation is given and information on the efficacy to

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Apr 1, 2013

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