The effect of tail docking in neonatal pigs on the central expression of genes involved in modulating anxiety-like behaviour

The effect of tail docking in neonatal pigs on the central expression of genes involved in... Abstracts / Scandinavian Journal of Pain 8 (2015) 47–54were assessed. A linear mixed model (LMM) with random intercept and random slope was used. Difference scores were comparedbetween study I and II by independent t-tests (PPT and pain-6) andthe Mann–Whitney U test (KSS).Results: Baseline subjective sleepiness (KSS), PPT or pain-6 ratings did not differ between study I and II (p > 0.47). KSS and heat painratings increased after both sleep conditions (p < 0.001), but did notdiffer between study I and II (p > 0.15). PPT was lower after experimental SR (p = 0.007), but unchanged after night work (p = 0.63),but did not differ between study I and II (p = 0.16).Conclusions: Both experimental and night work-induced SRleads to comparable increased subjective sleepiness and higherpain ratings to heat pain stimuli. PPT was lower after experimentalSR, but was not affected by night work-induced SR.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.04.018Local up-regulation of interferon-␥ (IFN-␥)following disc herniation is involved in theinflammatory response underlying acutelumbar radicular painG.H. Moen a,b,∗ , A. Moen a,c , J. Gjerstad a,b,caNational Institute of Occupational Health, NorwayDepartment of Molecular Biosciences, University ofOslo, Norwayc Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, NorwayE-mail address: gunnhelen.moen@stami.no (G.H.Moen).bAims: Lumbar radicular pain after disc herniation may be associated release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from nucleus pulposus(NP) tissue. In the present study we examined the role of interferon␥ (IFN-␥) and cluster of differentiation 68 (CD68) in the acute phaseof this process.Methods: First, in an animal model mimicking the clinical situation after disc herniation, the role of IFN-␥ on the dorsal horn singlecell activity and gene expression close to the nerve roots was studied. Second, in patients with severe lumbar radicular pain due todisc herniation, we examined how two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs2069705 and rs2069718) important for the IFN-␥expression influenced the pain and disability measured by visualanalogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI).Results: The animal data demonstrated a significant increasein the nociceptive activity at the spinal level after local application of NP and IFN-␥ onto the nerve-roots. A positive correlationbetween IFN-␥ and CD68 in the NP tissue was also observed. Moreover, the data of the patients revealed that carriers of the IFN-␥SNPs; rs2069705 A allele and rs2069718 G allele had an increaseddisability score i.e. ODI.Conclusions: The present data suggest that IFN-␥ through activation of tissue-specific macrophages close to the nerve roots maybe important for acute inflammatory pain and disability followinglumbar disc herniation.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.04.01953The effect of tail docking in neonatal pigs on thecentral expression of genes involved inmodulating anxiety-like behaviourP. Oberst a , D.A. Sandercock b,∗ , P. Di Giminiani c ,S.A. Edwards c , P.J. Brunton aaDivision of Neurobiology, The Roslin Institute,University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, UKb Animal and Veterinary Science Research Group,Scotland’s Rural College, Easter Bush, UKc School of Agriculture, Food & Rural Development,Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UKE-mail addresses: dale.sandercock@sruc.ac.uk (D.A.Sandercock), p.j.brunton@ed.ac.uk (P.J. Brunton).Background: Adverse experiences in early life, such as exposure to stress, can have long term detrimental effects on the futurephysiology and behaviour of the animal. Typically animals exposedto such experiences are more anxious and more reactive to stressin later life. Tail biting is a major problem in modern pig production, both in terms of animal welfare and productivity. Tail dockingin early postnatal life is common practice to reduce risk of thisproblem, but causes pain and may alter pain sensitivity.Aims: To investigate whether a significant painful experiencein early life (tail docking) alters the expression of genes in theamygdala that are linked to an anxiety-prone phenotype.Methods:Eightfemalepiglets(Landrace/LargeWhite × synthetic sireline) were used. Four piglets were taildocked (amputation of approx. 2/3 of the tail) on post-natal day3 using hot-iron cautery and four sham-docked piglets served asintact controls. On post-natal day 10, pigs were sedated and theneuthanized by barbiturate overdose. Brains were removed, theamygdala grossly dissected and frozen on dry ice. 20 ␮m sectionswere cut and subsequently processed using in situ hybridisationwith radiolabelled probes complementary to corticotropinreleasing hormone receptor-1 (Crhr1) and CRH receptor-2 (Crhr2)mRNA.Results: Crhr1 mRNA expression was significantly greater in theamygdala of tail-docked piglets compared with the sham-dockedanimals. There was no significant difference detected in Crhr2expression in the amygdala between the groups.Conclusion: Increased expression of Crhr1 in the amygdala isassociated with an anxiety-prone phenotype in rats and pigs, thusit is likely that tail docking in early life leads to enhanced anxiety which may have a negative impact on pig welfare. Ongoingexperiments will determine whether these central changes in geneexpression are long-lasting.[Support: BBSRC/DEFRA, part of ANIWHA ERA-NET initiative].http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.04.020Blockage of lysophosphatidic acid reversesarthritis-induced hypersensitivity and Cav␣2␦1and P2X3 expression in dorsal root gangliaJ. Su a,∗ , A. Delaney a , R. Matteo b , B. Bartlett b , K.Kultima a , T. Hökfelt c , C.I. Svensson aaDepartment of Physiology and Pharmacology,Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Swedenb Lpath, Inc., San Diego, CA, USAc Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet,Stockholm, SwedenE-mail address: jie.su@ki.se (J. Su).Aims: The lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an important mediator involved in neuropathic and bone cancer pain models. We http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

The effect of tail docking in neonatal pigs on the central expression of genes involved in modulating anxiety-like behaviour

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De Gruyter
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© 2015 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
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1877-8860
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1877-8879
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10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.04.020
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Abstract

Abstracts / Scandinavian Journal of Pain 8 (2015) 47–54were assessed. A linear mixed model (LMM) with random intercept and random slope was used. Difference scores were comparedbetween study I and II by independent t-tests (PPT and pain-6) andthe Mann–Whitney U test (KSS).Results: Baseline subjective sleepiness (KSS), PPT or pain-6 ratings did not differ between study I and II (p > 0.47). KSS and heat painratings increased after both sleep conditions (p < 0.001), but did notdiffer between study I and II (p > 0.15). PPT was lower after experimental SR (p = 0.007), but unchanged after night work (p = 0.63),but did not differ between study I and II (p = 0.16).Conclusions: Both experimental and night work-induced SRleads to comparable increased subjective sleepiness and higherpain ratings to heat pain stimuli. PPT was lower after experimentalSR, but was not affected by night work-induced SR.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.04.018Local up-regulation of interferon-␥ (IFN-␥)following disc herniation is involved in theinflammatory response underlying acutelumbar radicular painG.H. Moen a,b,∗ , A. Moen a,c , J. Gjerstad a,b,caNational Institute of Occupational Health, NorwayDepartment of Molecular Biosciences, University ofOslo, Norwayc Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, NorwayE-mail address: gunnhelen.moen@stami.no (G.H.Moen).bAims: Lumbar radicular pain after disc herniation may be associated release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from nucleus pulposus(NP) tissue. In the present study we examined the role of interferon␥ (IFN-␥) and cluster of differentiation 68 (CD68) in the acute phaseof this process.Methods: First, in an animal model mimicking the clinical situation after disc herniation, the role of IFN-␥ on the dorsal horn singlecell activity and gene expression close to the nerve roots was studied. Second, in patients with severe lumbar radicular pain due todisc herniation, we examined how two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs2069705 and rs2069718) important for the IFN-␥expression influenced the pain and disability measured by visualanalogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI).Results: The animal data demonstrated a significant increasein the nociceptive activity at the spinal level after local application of NP and IFN-␥ onto the nerve-roots. A positive correlationbetween IFN-␥ and CD68 in the NP tissue was also observed. Moreover, the data of the patients revealed that carriers of the IFN-␥SNPs; rs2069705 A allele and rs2069718 G allele had an increaseddisability score i.e. ODI.Conclusions: The present data suggest that IFN-␥ through activation of tissue-specific macrophages close to the nerve roots maybe important for acute inflammatory pain and disability followinglumbar disc herniation.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.04.01953The effect of tail docking in neonatal pigs on thecentral expression of genes involved inmodulating anxiety-like behaviourP. Oberst a , D.A. Sandercock b,∗ , P. Di Giminiani c ,S.A. Edwards c , P.J. Brunton aaDivision of Neurobiology, The Roslin Institute,University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, UKb Animal and Veterinary Science Research Group,Scotland’s Rural College, Easter Bush, UKc School of Agriculture, Food & Rural Development,Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UKE-mail addresses: dale.sandercock@sruc.ac.uk (D.A.Sandercock), p.j.brunton@ed.ac.uk (P.J. Brunton).Background: Adverse experiences in early life, such as exposure to stress, can have long term detrimental effects on the futurephysiology and behaviour of the animal. Typically animals exposedto such experiences are more anxious and more reactive to stressin later life. Tail biting is a major problem in modern pig production, both in terms of animal welfare and productivity. Tail dockingin early postnatal life is common practice to reduce risk of thisproblem, but causes pain and may alter pain sensitivity.Aims: To investigate whether a significant painful experiencein early life (tail docking) alters the expression of genes in theamygdala that are linked to an anxiety-prone phenotype.Methods:Eightfemalepiglets(Landrace/LargeWhite × synthetic sireline) were used. Four piglets were taildocked (amputation of approx. 2/3 of the tail) on post-natal day3 using hot-iron cautery and four sham-docked piglets served asintact controls. On post-natal day 10, pigs were sedated and theneuthanized by barbiturate overdose. Brains were removed, theamygdala grossly dissected and frozen on dry ice. 20 ␮m sectionswere cut and subsequently processed using in situ hybridisationwith radiolabelled probes complementary to corticotropinreleasing hormone receptor-1 (Crhr1) and CRH receptor-2 (Crhr2)mRNA.Results: Crhr1 mRNA expression was significantly greater in theamygdala of tail-docked piglets compared with the sham-dockedanimals. There was no significant difference detected in Crhr2expression in the amygdala between the groups.Conclusion: Increased expression of Crhr1 in the amygdala isassociated with an anxiety-prone phenotype in rats and pigs, thusit is likely that tail docking in early life leads to enhanced anxiety which may have a negative impact on pig welfare. Ongoingexperiments will determine whether these central changes in geneexpression are long-lasting.[Support: BBSRC/DEFRA, part of ANIWHA ERA-NET initiative].http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.04.020Blockage of lysophosphatidic acid reversesarthritis-induced hypersensitivity and Cav␣2␦1and P2X3 expression in dorsal root gangliaJ. Su a,∗ , A. Delaney a , R. Matteo b , B. Bartlett b , K.Kultima a , T. Hökfelt c , C.I. Svensson aaDepartment of Physiology and Pharmacology,Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Swedenb Lpath, Inc., San Diego, CA, USAc Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet,Stockholm, SwedenE-mail address: jie.su@ki.se (J. Su).Aims: The lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an important mediator involved in neuropathic and bone cancer pain models. We

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Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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