The burden of central anticholinergic drugs increases pain and cognitive dysfunction. More knowledge about drug-interactions needed

The burden of central anticholinergic drugs increases pain and cognitive dysfunction. More... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Flavia Karine Rigo and co-workers in Brazil report on their studies that revealed a cholinergic mechanism of the antinociceptive action of a peptide from a spider-toxin [1]. Their study is well done and well reported, following the ARRIVE-recommendations for doing and reporting animal research [2]. They found that in a chronic nerve/nerve-root constriction model (model of neuropathic pain) this peptide causes a robust reduction in mechanical withdrawal (~reduction of neuropathic pain), and in pain caused by paw-injection of capsaicin [1]. The mechanism of this effect was clearly demonstrated to be via inhibiting acetylcholine-esterase (AChE) in the CNS (spinal cord). Being a peptide, they had to inject this peptide intrathecally (IT), directly in to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).1More attention needed on benefits of cholinergic drugs and on the negative effects on cognitive functions and pain from anticholinergic drugsWe publish their study-report [1] also because clinicians need more knowledge and attention to the beneficial effects on cognitive functions and pain by cholinergic drugs, but even more so we need more knowledge about the burden of the multitude of anticholinergic drugs. Patients suffering from pain, especially our elderly patients, are often exposed to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

The burden of central anticholinergic drugs increases pain and cognitive dysfunction. More knowledge about drug-interactions needed

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.09.022
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Flavia Karine Rigo and co-workers in Brazil report on their studies that revealed a cholinergic mechanism of the antinociceptive action of a peptide from a spider-toxin [1]. Their study is well done and well reported, following the ARRIVE-recommendations for doing and reporting animal research [2]. They found that in a chronic nerve/nerve-root constriction model (model of neuropathic pain) this peptide causes a robust reduction in mechanical withdrawal (~reduction of neuropathic pain), and in pain caused by paw-injection of capsaicin [1]. The mechanism of this effect was clearly demonstrated to be via inhibiting acetylcholine-esterase (AChE) in the CNS (spinal cord). Being a peptide, they had to inject this peptide intrathecally (IT), directly in to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).1More attention needed on benefits of cholinergic drugs and on the negative effects on cognitive functions and pain from anticholinergic drugsWe publish their study-report [1] also because clinicians need more knowledge and attention to the beneficial effects on cognitive functions and pain by cholinergic drugs, but even more so we need more knowledge about the burden of the multitude of anticholinergic drugs. Patients suffering from pain, especially our elderly patients, are often exposed to

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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