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Temperature-dependent synchrotron X-ray diffraction, pair distribution function and susceptibility study on the layered compound CrTe3

Temperature-dependent synchrotron X-ray diffraction, pair distribution function and... AbstractResults of combined synchrotron X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function experiments performed on the layered compound CrTe3 provide evidence for a short range structural distortion of one of the two crystallographically independent CrTe6 octahedra. The distortion is caused by higher mobility of one crystallographically distinct Te ion, leading to an unusual large Debye Waller factor. In situ high temperature X-ray diffraction investigations show an initial crystallization of a minor amount of elemental Te followed by decomposition of CrTe3 into Cr5Te8 and Te. Additional experiments provide evidence that the Te impurity (<1%) cannot be avoided. Analyses of structural changes in the temperature range 100–754 K show a pronounced anisotropic expansion of the lattice parameters. The differing behavior of the crystal axes is explained on the basis of structural distortions of the Cr4Te16 structural building units. An abrupt distortion of the structure occurs at T≈250 K, which then remains nearly constant down to 100 K. The structural distortion affects the spin exchange interactions between Cr3+ cations. A significant splitting between field-cooled (fc) and zero-field-cooled (zfc) magnetic susceptibility is observed below about 200 K. Applying a small external magnetic field results in a substantial spontaneous magnetization, reminiscent of ferro- or ferrimagnet exchange interactions below ~240 K. A Debye temperature of ~150 K was extracted from heat capacity measurements. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Zeitschrift für Kristallographie - Crystalline Materials de Gruyter

Temperature-dependent synchrotron X-ray diffraction, pair distribution function and susceptibility study on the layered compound CrTe3

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
©2017 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
2196-7105
eISSN
2196-7105
DOI
10.1515/zkri-2017-2100
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractResults of combined synchrotron X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function experiments performed on the layered compound CrTe3 provide evidence for a short range structural distortion of one of the two crystallographically independent CrTe6 octahedra. The distortion is caused by higher mobility of one crystallographically distinct Te ion, leading to an unusual large Debye Waller factor. In situ high temperature X-ray diffraction investigations show an initial crystallization of a minor amount of elemental Te followed by decomposition of CrTe3 into Cr5Te8 and Te. Additional experiments provide evidence that the Te impurity (<1%) cannot be avoided. Analyses of structural changes in the temperature range 100–754 K show a pronounced anisotropic expansion of the lattice parameters. The differing behavior of the crystal axes is explained on the basis of structural distortions of the Cr4Te16 structural building units. An abrupt distortion of the structure occurs at T≈250 K, which then remains nearly constant down to 100 K. The structural distortion affects the spin exchange interactions between Cr3+ cations. A significant splitting between field-cooled (fc) and zero-field-cooled (zfc) magnetic susceptibility is observed below about 200 K. Applying a small external magnetic field results in a substantial spontaneous magnetization, reminiscent of ferro- or ferrimagnet exchange interactions below ~240 K. A Debye temperature of ~150 K was extracted from heat capacity measurements.

Journal

Zeitschrift für Kristallographie - Crystalline Materialsde Gruyter

Published: Jun 27, 2018

References