Single cases are complex Illustrated by Flink et al. ‘Happy despite pain: A pilot study of a positive psychology intervention for patients with chronic pain’

Single cases are complex Illustrated by Flink et al. ‘Happy despite pain: A pilot study of a... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Ida Katrina Flink and her colleagues report a short series (n = 4) of single case experiments testing the potential impact of a positive psychology intervention for people with chronic pain on self-report measures of affect and catastrophizing [1]. The study is notable for several reasons. First, it is among the first to apply positive psychology techniques to chronic pain. Most current psychological methods are guided by the ubiquitous cognitive-behavioural strategy that focuses on ‘negative’ thinking and appraisal processes that are presumed to be causally related to poor adjustment. The primary aim of CBT is thus to reducing distress and improving function. By way of contrast positive psychology aims to increase the ratio of positive to negative emotions by strengthening positive affect and well-being.Flink et al. used a set of positive psychology exercises that have been shown to produce beneficial effects with other groups (summarised in Table 2 of their article). Second, the authors elected to use experimental single case methodology to test the intervention. The fundamental features of single case methods are many repeated observations across different conditions, e.g., notreatment and treatment, so that the participant acts as their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Single cases are complex Illustrated by Flink et al. ‘Happy despite pain: A pilot study of a positive psychology intervention for patients with chronic pain’

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2015 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.02.004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Ida Katrina Flink and her colleagues report a short series (n = 4) of single case experiments testing the potential impact of a positive psychology intervention for people with chronic pain on self-report measures of affect and catastrophizing [1]. The study is notable for several reasons. First, it is among the first to apply positive psychology techniques to chronic pain. Most current psychological methods are guided by the ubiquitous cognitive-behavioural strategy that focuses on ‘negative’ thinking and appraisal processes that are presumed to be causally related to poor adjustment. The primary aim of CBT is thus to reducing distress and improving function. By way of contrast positive psychology aims to increase the ratio of positive to negative emotions by strengthening positive affect and well-being.Flink et al. used a set of positive psychology exercises that have been shown to produce beneficial effects with other groups (summarised in Table 2 of their article). Second, the authors elected to use experimental single case methodology to test the intervention. The fundamental features of single case methods are many repeated observations across different conditions, e.g., notreatment and treatment, so that the participant acts as their

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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