Shakespeare, Court Dramatist

Shakespeare, Court Dramatist The 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death in 2016 has once again made it abundantly clear that the Shakespeare of the twenty-first century has as many different faces as there are people and groups reading, staging, and watching his plays. That is how an English playwright’s work can form the basis for a production with deeply postcolonial themes, and it is how a man of the sixteenth and seventeenth century can become a proto-feminist: through interpreting his work, Shakespeare can be whoever we want him to be. One of the images that has persisted for a long time is of course that of Shakespeare as a man of the masses, a writer for the groundlings at the Globe rather than the aristocrats at the court.In Shakespeare, Court Dramatist, Richard Dutton argues that the court of Elizabeth I and James I respectively not only had an influence on Shakespeare’s writing process but that this influence is in no small part responsible for those versions of some plays we are most familiar with today. At the heart of Dutton’s research lies the hypothesis that Shakespeare regularly revised and adjusted his plays specifically for performance at (and at the request of) the court. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Zeitschrift für Anglistik und Amerikanistik de Gruyter

Shakespeare, Court Dramatist

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
©2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
0044-2305
D.O.I.
10.1515/zaa-2018-0013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death in 2016 has once again made it abundantly clear that the Shakespeare of the twenty-first century has as many different faces as there are people and groups reading, staging, and watching his plays. That is how an English playwright’s work can form the basis for a production with deeply postcolonial themes, and it is how a man of the sixteenth and seventeenth century can become a proto-feminist: through interpreting his work, Shakespeare can be whoever we want him to be. One of the images that has persisted for a long time is of course that of Shakespeare as a man of the masses, a writer for the groundlings at the Globe rather than the aristocrats at the court.In Shakespeare, Court Dramatist, Richard Dutton argues that the court of Elizabeth I and James I respectively not only had an influence on Shakespeare’s writing process but that this influence is in no small part responsible for those versions of some plays we are most familiar with today. At the heart of Dutton’s research lies the hypothesis that Shakespeare regularly revised and adjusted his plays specifically for performance at (and at the request of) the court.

Journal

Zeitschrift für Anglistik und Amerikanistikde Gruyter

Published: Mar 28, 2018

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