Several days of muscle hyperalgesia facilitates cortical somatosensory excitability

Several days of muscle hyperalgesia facilitates cortical somatosensory excitability Scientific presentations at the 2017 Annual Meeting / Scandinavian Journal of Pain 16 (2017) 165–188The link between chronic musculoskeletal painand sperm quality in overweight orthopedicpatientsDardmeh a,b,∗ ,Alipour a ,Nielsen a ,F.H.H.I.S.Rasmussen c , G. Van Der Horst d , P. Gazerani a,baDepartment of Health Science and Technology,Biomedicine Group, Faculty of Medicine, AalborgUniversity, Aalborg, Denmarkb Center for Sensory – Motor Interaction (SMI),Department of Health Science and Technology,Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg,Denmarkc Department of clinical medicine, The faculty ofMedicine, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg,Denmarkd University of the Western Cape, Department ofMedical Bioscience, Cape town, South AfricaE-mail address: feda@hst.aau.dk (F. Dardmeh).Aims: The association between low fertility potential and anoverweight is well recognized. In addition, a link between pain andoverweight condition has been identified. However, it is not knownwhether overweight pain patients present any alterations in fertility potentials. Hence, the current study provided a profoundervision into the possible relation between an overweight condition,chronic musculoskeletal pain, and fertility potential in overweightmale patients.Methods: This “observational study” was based on 10 overweight chronic pain patients (OP and 10 healthy matched controls(OC) from the referrals to the orthopedic department at AalborgUniversity Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. The study was approved bythe regional Ethics Committee of the Northern Jutland, Denmarkand conducted from June 2014 to December 2015. Semen samples were obtained from all participants and assessed for spermconcentration, motility, and kinematic parameters with the Sperm®Class Analyzer (SCA , Spain). Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) werealso measured by a handheld pressure algometer in 16 pre-definedpoints of the subjects in both groups.Results: The OP group demonstrated a decline in PPT valuescompared to the (OC); however, difference between the two wasinsignificant. But, the OP group showed a lower percentage ofstatic and non-progressive motile sperm (P < 0.05). The sperm kinematic parameters (progressive motility, VCL, VSL, VAP and BCF) alsodemonstrated a lower trend in OP group in comparison with thecontrols.Conclusions: This study presented that sperm quality declinesin overweight chronic pain patients. Since the control groupconsisted of pain free overweight individuals, we propose thatchronic musculoskeletal pain could potentially affect sperm quality, distinct from what an overweight alone does to the male fertilitypotential. However, further investigation in overweight chronicpain patients of different types is required before a general conclusion can be made. In addition, mechanisms underlying such effectsneed further clarification.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.015169Several days of muscle hyperalgesia facilitatescortical somatosensory excitabilityE. De Martino a,∗ , L. Petrini a , S. Schabrun b , T.Graven-Nielsen aaCenter for Neuroplasticity and Pain (CNAP), SMI,Department of Health Science and Technology, TheFaculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Denmarkb Brain Rehabilitation and Neuroplasticity Unit(BRAiN-u), Western Sydney University, School ofScience and Heath, Sydney, AustraliaE-mail address: edm@hst.aau.dk (E. De Martino).Background and aims: Maladaptive plasticity in neural circuits has been proposed in chronic musculoskeletal pain and hasbeen discussed as a key component of the transition from acuteto chronic pain. The induction of delayed onset muscle soreness(DOMS) in healthy individuals is one method that can be used toinvestigate the adaptations of neural circuits in response to severaldays of muscle hyperalgesia. The aim of this study was to determinethe adaptations of the sensory cortex in response to muscle hyperalgesia induced by eccentric exercise of the wrist extensor muscles.It was hypothesized that muscle hyperalgesia would result in afacilitation of cortical somatosensory excitability, based on sensory evoked potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of the radialnerve.Methods: Twelve healthy subjects performed eccentric exerciseof the wrist extensors. Muscle soreness, pressure pain thresholds(PPTs) on the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, somatosensoryevoked potentials (SEPs) based on 10 channel EEG recorded during electrical stimulation of the radial nerve were recorded before(Day0Pre), 2 h (Day0Post), 2 days (Day2), and 6 days (Day6) afterexercise.Results: Compared to Day0Pre: (i) Muscle soreness increased atDay0Post and increased further at Day2 (both P < 0.05). (ii) Pressurepain thresholds decreased at Day2 (P < 0.05), (iii) the peak-to-peakN30-P45 and P45-N60 amplitude of the sensory evoked potentialfrom the central-parietal recording sites were increased at Day2(both P < 0.05); (iv) reduction in ECR PPTs was correlated with anincrease of the post-central P45 wave.Conclusions: These data demonstrate that hyperalgesia developing across several days is accompanied by an increase in sensorycortical excitability. In addition, sensory cortical adaptation followed a similar temporal profile to increased sensitivity to pressure(PPTs). This model may be relevant for further understanding neural adaptation in the transition from acute to chronic pain.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.016Social stress, epigenetic changes and painM.B. Eriksen a,b,∗ , D.P. Jacobsen a,b , J. Gjerstad a,baThe National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo,Norwayb Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo,NorwayE-mail address: Mina.Eriksen@stami.no (M.B. Eriksen).Aims: Bullying is a prevalent issue in society, with adverseeffects ranging from psychological symptoms to somatic ailmentslike chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to generate newknowledge about the underlying mechanisms behind this association. Using an animal model, we investigated the changes inmicroRNA expression in plasma, in the pituitary gland and theadrenal gland following social stress.Methods: A resident-intruder paradigm where male SpragueDawley rats (intruders) were exposed to male Long Evans rats http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Several days of muscle hyperalgesia facilitates cortical somatosensory excitability

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Abstract

Scientific presentations at the 2017 Annual Meeting / Scandinavian Journal of Pain 16 (2017) 165–188The link between chronic musculoskeletal painand sperm quality in overweight orthopedicpatientsDardmeh a,b,∗ ,Alipour a ,Nielsen a ,F.H.H.I.S.Rasmussen c , G. Van Der Horst d , P. Gazerani a,baDepartment of Health Science and Technology,Biomedicine Group, Faculty of Medicine, AalborgUniversity, Aalborg, Denmarkb Center for Sensory – Motor Interaction (SMI),Department of Health Science and Technology,Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg,Denmarkc Department of clinical medicine, The faculty ofMedicine, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg,Denmarkd University of the Western Cape, Department ofMedical Bioscience, Cape town, South AfricaE-mail address: feda@hst.aau.dk (F. Dardmeh).Aims: The association between low fertility potential and anoverweight is well recognized. In addition, a link between pain andoverweight condition has been identified. However, it is not knownwhether overweight pain patients present any alterations in fertility potentials. Hence, the current study provided a profoundervision into the possible relation between an overweight condition,chronic musculoskeletal pain, and fertility potential in overweightmale patients.Methods: This “observational study” was based on 10 overweight chronic pain patients (OP and 10 healthy matched controls(OC) from the referrals to the orthopedic department at AalborgUniversity Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. The study was approved bythe regional Ethics Committee of the Northern Jutland, Denmarkand conducted from June 2014 to December 2015. Semen samples were obtained from all participants and assessed for spermconcentration, motility, and kinematic parameters with the Sperm®Class Analyzer (SCA , Spain). Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) werealso measured by a handheld pressure algometer in 16 pre-definedpoints of the subjects in both groups.Results: The OP group demonstrated a decline in PPT valuescompared to the (OC); however, difference between the two wasinsignificant. But, the OP group showed a lower percentage ofstatic and non-progressive motile sperm (P < 0.05). The sperm kinematic parameters (progressive motility, VCL, VSL, VAP and BCF) alsodemonstrated a lower trend in OP group in comparison with thecontrols.Conclusions: This study presented that sperm quality declinesin overweight chronic pain patients. Since the control groupconsisted of pain free overweight individuals, we propose thatchronic musculoskeletal pain could potentially affect sperm quality, distinct from what an overweight alone does to the male fertilitypotential. However, further investigation in overweight chronicpain patients of different types is required before a general conclusion can be made. In addition, mechanisms underlying such effectsneed further clarification.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.015169Several days of muscle hyperalgesia facilitatescortical somatosensory excitabilityE. De Martino a,∗ , L. Petrini a , S. Schabrun b , T.Graven-Nielsen aaCenter for Neuroplasticity and Pain (CNAP), SMI,Department of Health Science and Technology, TheFaculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Denmarkb Brain Rehabilitation and Neuroplasticity Unit(BRAiN-u), Western Sydney University, School ofScience and Heath, Sydney, AustraliaE-mail address: edm@hst.aau.dk (E. De Martino).Background and aims: Maladaptive plasticity in neural circuits has been proposed in chronic musculoskeletal pain and hasbeen discussed as a key component of the transition from acuteto chronic pain. The induction of delayed onset muscle soreness(DOMS) in healthy individuals is one method that can be used toinvestigate the adaptations of neural circuits in response to severaldays of muscle hyperalgesia. The aim of this study was to determinethe adaptations of the sensory cortex in response to muscle hyperalgesia induced by eccentric exercise of the wrist extensor muscles.It was hypothesized that muscle hyperalgesia would result in afacilitation of cortical somatosensory excitability, based on sensory evoked potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of the radialnerve.Methods: Twelve healthy subjects performed eccentric exerciseof the wrist extensors. Muscle soreness, pressure pain thresholds(PPTs) on the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, somatosensoryevoked potentials (SEPs) based on 10 channel EEG recorded during electrical stimulation of the radial nerve were recorded before(Day0Pre), 2 h (Day0Post), 2 days (Day2), and 6 days (Day6) afterexercise.Results: Compared to Day0Pre: (i) Muscle soreness increased atDay0Post and increased further at Day2 (both P < 0.05). (ii) Pressurepain thresholds decreased at Day2 (P < 0.05), (iii) the peak-to-peakN30-P45 and P45-N60 amplitude of the sensory evoked potentialfrom the central-parietal recording sites were increased at Day2(both P < 0.05); (iv) reduction in ECR PPTs was correlated with anincrease of the post-central P45 wave.Conclusions: These data demonstrate that hyperalgesia developing across several days is accompanied by an increase in sensorycortical excitability. In addition, sensory cortical adaptation followed a similar temporal profile to increased sensitivity to pressure(PPTs). This model may be relevant for further understanding neural adaptation in the transition from acute to chronic pain.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.016Social stress, epigenetic changes and painM.B. Eriksen a,b,∗ , D.P. Jacobsen a,b , J. Gjerstad a,baThe National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo,Norwayb Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo,NorwayE-mail address: Mina.Eriksen@stami.no (M.B. Eriksen).Aims: Bullying is a prevalent issue in society, with adverseeffects ranging from psychological symptoms to somatic ailmentslike chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to generate newknowledge about the underlying mechanisms behind this association. Using an animal model, we investigated the changes inmicroRNA expression in plasma, in the pituitary gland and theadrenal gland following social stress.Methods: A resident-intruder paradigm where male SpragueDawley rats (intruders) were exposed to male Long Evans rats

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Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Jul 1, 2017

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