Sample size and effect size calculations are necessary in clinical studies in order to avoid false positive and false negative conclusions

Sample size and effect size calculations are necessary in clinical studies in order to avoid... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Katja Venborg Pedersen and coworkers [1] present an interesting study evaluating the influence of unilateral painful visceral disease on sensory and morphometric changes in the referred pain area. Twenty-four patients with unilateral pain from kidney stone disease were studied before and after endoscopic percutaneous kidney stone surgery. These patients had suffered from the stone disease in median 7 months, and 9 of the patients had experienced 10 or more episodes of painful stone colics. Sensory assessments included electrical and mechanical stimuli, and morphometric analyses were by CT-and ultrasound-scans. The authors did not observe any differences between the ipsilateral and contralateral flanks, in regard to pain threshold, temporal summation, or tissue volume. This is a well-performed study that contradicts results of several comparable studies. The authors also deserve much credit for presenting skillfully, balanced arguments for this discrepancy. We will shortly return to this issue.1Are negative studies unsexy, not interesting and not worthy of publication?Based on the many negative findings of the study, a provocative discussion is offered: should studies with non-significant findings be published or not? Thirteen comparisons were made in this study, 10 of these were non-significant. Studies rejecting http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Sample size and effect size calculations are necessary in clinical studies in order to avoid false positive and false negative conclusions

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2013 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2013.04.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Katja Venborg Pedersen and coworkers [1] present an interesting study evaluating the influence of unilateral painful visceral disease on sensory and morphometric changes in the referred pain area. Twenty-four patients with unilateral pain from kidney stone disease were studied before and after endoscopic percutaneous kidney stone surgery. These patients had suffered from the stone disease in median 7 months, and 9 of the patients had experienced 10 or more episodes of painful stone colics. Sensory assessments included electrical and mechanical stimuli, and morphometric analyses were by CT-and ultrasound-scans. The authors did not observe any differences between the ipsilateral and contralateral flanks, in regard to pain threshold, temporal summation, or tissue volume. This is a well-performed study that contradicts results of several comparable studies. The authors also deserve much credit for presenting skillfully, balanced arguments for this discrepancy. We will shortly return to this issue.1Are negative studies unsexy, not interesting and not worthy of publication?Based on the many negative findings of the study, a provocative discussion is offered: should studies with non-significant findings be published or not? Thirteen comparisons were made in this study, 10 of these were non-significant. Studies rejecting

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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