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Sacrifice, Metaphor, and Evolution: Towards a Cognitive Linguistic Theology of Sacrifice

Sacrifice, Metaphor, and Evolution: Towards a Cognitive Linguistic Theology of Sacrifice AbstractThis article lays the groundwork for articulating a Christian theology of sacrifice within the framework of cognitive linguistics. I demonstrate the affinity and potential for mutual enrichment between three disparate fields of discourse. Beginning with Jonathan Klawans’s methodological proposals for understanding sacrifice as a meaningful phenomenon for those who engage(d) in it, I suggest that the double-scope conceptual blending described by Gilles Fauconnier and Mark Turner provides a helpful resource for Klawans to clarify his thought and answer objections to his proposals. Fauconnier and Turner’s account of double-scope blends is set within an evolutionary account of human development and is the condition of possibility for language, art, science, and religion. I then put Fauconnier and Turner into dialogue with Sarah Coakley’s recent attempts to locate sacrifice within the evolutionary spectrum, and suggest that they provide a more helpful theory of language than Chomsky’s purely formal account. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Open Theology de Gruyter

Sacrifice, Metaphor, and Evolution: Towards a Cognitive Linguistic Theology of Sacrifice

Open Theology , Volume 4 (1): 14 – Jan 1, 2018

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References (96)

Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2018
ISSN
2300-6579
eISSN
2300-6579
DOI
10.1515/opth-2018-0001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis article lays the groundwork for articulating a Christian theology of sacrifice within the framework of cognitive linguistics. I demonstrate the affinity and potential for mutual enrichment between three disparate fields of discourse. Beginning with Jonathan Klawans’s methodological proposals for understanding sacrifice as a meaningful phenomenon for those who engage(d) in it, I suggest that the double-scope conceptual blending described by Gilles Fauconnier and Mark Turner provides a helpful resource for Klawans to clarify his thought and answer objections to his proposals. Fauconnier and Turner’s account of double-scope blends is set within an evolutionary account of human development and is the condition of possibility for language, art, science, and religion. I then put Fauconnier and Turner into dialogue with Sarah Coakley’s recent attempts to locate sacrifice within the evolutionary spectrum, and suggest that they provide a more helpful theory of language than Chomsky’s purely formal account.

Journal

Open Theologyde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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