Radiative sky cooling: fundamental physics, materials, structures, and applications

Radiative sky cooling: fundamental physics, materials, structures, and applications AbstractRadiative sky cooling reduces the temperature of a system by promoting heat exchange with the sky; its key advantage is that no input energy is required. We will review the origins of radiative sky cooling from ancient times to the modern day, and illustrate how the fundamental physics of radiative cooling calls for a combination of properties that may not occur in bulk materials. A detailed comparison with recent modeling and experiments on nanophotonic structures will then illustrate the advantages of this recently emerging approach. Potential applications of these radiative cooling materials to a variety of temperature-sensitive optoelectronic devices, such as photovoltaics, thermophotovoltaics, rectennas, and infrared detectors, will then be discussed. This review will conclude by forecasting the prospects for the field as a whole in both terrestrial and space-based systems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nanophotonics de Gruyter

Radiative sky cooling: fundamental physics, materials, structures, and applications

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
©2017, Peter Bermel et al., published by De Gruyter, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
2192-8614
eISSN
2192-8614
D.O.I.
10.1515/nanoph-2017-0020
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractRadiative sky cooling reduces the temperature of a system by promoting heat exchange with the sky; its key advantage is that no input energy is required. We will review the origins of radiative sky cooling from ancient times to the modern day, and illustrate how the fundamental physics of radiative cooling calls for a combination of properties that may not occur in bulk materials. A detailed comparison with recent modeling and experiments on nanophotonic structures will then illustrate the advantages of this recently emerging approach. Potential applications of these radiative cooling materials to a variety of temperature-sensitive optoelectronic devices, such as photovoltaics, thermophotovoltaics, rectennas, and infrared detectors, will then be discussed. This review will conclude by forecasting the prospects for the field as a whole in both terrestrial and space-based systems.

Journal

Nanophotonicsde Gruyter

Published: Jul 29, 2017

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