Quantitative sensory tests (QST) are promising tests for clinical relevance of anti–nociceptive effects of new analgesic treatments

Quantitative sensory tests (QST) are promising tests for clinical relevance of anti–nociceptive... 1IntroductionIn this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Juerg Schliess-bach and coworkers [1] report the findings in several quantitative sensory tests (QST) assessing nociception compared to clinical treatment effect in 50 chronic low-back pain patients randomized to receive oxycodone or placebo in a double-blind RCT with crossover design. Acute anti-nociceptive QST effects of oxycodone were assessed against its clinical analgesic efficacy, with special emphasis on the ability of QST findings to predict and differentiate clinical responders from non-responders. This is a novel approach to utilize QST measures in a relevant clinical setting, which might prove useful for future preclinical and clinical trials on analgesic drugs.2Difficult task of assessing pain and measuring analgesiaPain is a multifaceted subjective experience, which cannot be assessed with external objective measures nor easily be reduced to one-dimensional figures. Both in clinical research and practice, analgesic treatment efficacy is evaluated with subjective symptom severity scales whereas experimental preclinical studies apply different QST measures. Due to differences in these testing algorithms, there is disappointingly often a mismatch between promising pre-clinical but failing clinical outcomes for novel drugs. This might be improved by validating and assessing the predictive value of antinociceptive QST alterations against clinical analgesic efficacy http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Quantitative sensory tests (QST) are promising tests for clinical relevance of anti–nociceptive effects of new analgesic treatments

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.08.004
Publisher site
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Abstract

1IntroductionIn this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Juerg Schliess-bach and coworkers [1] report the findings in several quantitative sensory tests (QST) assessing nociception compared to clinical treatment effect in 50 chronic low-back pain patients randomized to receive oxycodone or placebo in a double-blind RCT with crossover design. Acute anti-nociceptive QST effects of oxycodone were assessed against its clinical analgesic efficacy, with special emphasis on the ability of QST findings to predict and differentiate clinical responders from non-responders. This is a novel approach to utilize QST measures in a relevant clinical setting, which might prove useful for future preclinical and clinical trials on analgesic drugs.2Difficult task of assessing pain and measuring analgesiaPain is a multifaceted subjective experience, which cannot be assessed with external objective measures nor easily be reduced to one-dimensional figures. Both in clinical research and practice, analgesic treatment efficacy is evaluated with subjective symptom severity scales whereas experimental preclinical studies apply different QST measures. Due to differences in these testing algorithms, there is disappointingly often a mismatch between promising pre-clinical but failing clinical outcomes for novel drugs. This might be improved by validating and assessing the predictive value of antinociceptive QST alterations against clinical analgesic efficacy

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2017

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