Preoperative quantitative sensory testing (QST) predicting postoperative pain: Image or mirage?

Preoperative quantitative sensory testing (QST) predicting postoperative pain: Image or mirage? In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Sangesland, and coworkers in a systematic literature review examine the value of preoperative quantitative sensory testing in predicting postoperative pain outcomes [1].The authors are to be congratulated upon a diligent piece of work on a clinically important and relevant issue. Does preoperatively conducted quantitative sensory testing mirror the clinical endpoints pertaining to postoperative pain-related issues, i.e., pain-scores, the requirement of analgesics, or functional scores? An unsatisfactory acute postsurgical recovery may pave the way for severe persistent post-surgical pain – a peril to 2–10% of the surgical population [2].The conclusion of the review is obviously disappointing, but hardly surprising, taking the heterogeneity in research methods regarding outcomes, characteristics of patient cohorts, surgical procedures and statistical methods into consideration. Nonetheless, it is of major value once in a while to meticulously and systematically, update and assemble data in a specific research field, using the “carrot and stick” modus operandi, inspiring and compelling researchers to improve and standardize their research methods. Furthermore, the review is well performed, extremely well-written, a good “read” and really, a “must” for all anesthesiologists and surgeons interested in prediction of post-surgical recovery trajectories [1].1Basics of quantitative sensory testingQuantitative http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Preoperative quantitative sensory testing (QST) predicting postoperative pain: Image or mirage?

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.01.012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Sangesland, and coworkers in a systematic literature review examine the value of preoperative quantitative sensory testing in predicting postoperative pain outcomes [1].The authors are to be congratulated upon a diligent piece of work on a clinically important and relevant issue. Does preoperatively conducted quantitative sensory testing mirror the clinical endpoints pertaining to postoperative pain-related issues, i.e., pain-scores, the requirement of analgesics, or functional scores? An unsatisfactory acute postsurgical recovery may pave the way for severe persistent post-surgical pain – a peril to 2–10% of the surgical population [2].The conclusion of the review is obviously disappointing, but hardly surprising, taking the heterogeneity in research methods regarding outcomes, characteristics of patient cohorts, surgical procedures and statistical methods into consideration. Nonetheless, it is of major value once in a while to meticulously and systematically, update and assemble data in a specific research field, using the “carrot and stick” modus operandi, inspiring and compelling researchers to improve and standardize their research methods. Furthermore, the review is well performed, extremely well-written, a good “read” and really, a “must” for all anesthesiologists and surgeons interested in prediction of post-surgical recovery trajectories [1].1Basics of quantitative sensory testingQuantitative

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Apr 1, 2017

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