Practitioners’ perspective on pain disabilities in Ghanaian women. A qualitative study

Practitioners’ perspective on pain disabilities in Ghanaian women. A qualitative study AbstractAimsWomen show higher frequency of most painful disorders. This is usually explained that endogenous pain modulation pathways, which affect incoming nociceptive signals, act differently in women and men, but psycho-social factors are likelytoinfluence as well. Ghanaian women suffer different disabilities that may lead to severe pain. The hard climatic conditions and the hard physical toil in work exert untold injuries. How do women in Ghana cope with painful disorders, and do they show certain behavioural pattern during diagnosis and treatments?MethodsThe study used in-depth interviews with health care providers to accomplish its aim. The “snowball effect” was added by which those interviewed aided us to find other prospective interviewee. In qualitative methodology, such an approach can be adopted to enable the researcher acquire relevant data with help from respondents.Practitioners were askedtoreflectontheir experiences from meeting women with severe pain as their patients. Seven practitioners, four female and three male, were interviewed.ResultsBy talking spontaneously about pain, women cope with painful disorders. This ensures easy diagnoses and treatments. The majority of women report their severe pain disabilities freely as against a smaller group who behave differently.The other group has explored other practitioners and have been unsuccessful. They are afraid to reveal their situations openly. Others test the skills of the practitioners whether they could perform efficient diagnoses. This strengthens patients’ faith and ability to be cured. In behavioural terms, inability to report severe pain stem from comorbid depressive symptoms (timidity-shyness, over-worried/confusion, distraction), lack of trust-expectant faith, thought of practitioner’s omniscient power, threat of practitioner’s knowledge (patient’s wrongs and evil thoughts), religious affiliation-constraints, etc. Women cope and show more positive attitudes than men; they expect practitioners to be in careful control.ConclusionsGhanaian women deal with their severe pains in meaningful manner by talking spontaneously about them. They show their willingness to be helped during diagnosis. Only few patients are not spontaneous, and are due to the condition of the mind and uncertainty with previous treatment encounters. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Practitioners’ perspective on pain disabilities in Ghanaian women. A qualitative study

Loading next page...
 
/lp/degruyter/practitioners-perspective-on-pain-disabilities-in-ghanaian-women-a-nscH9SP6o0
Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2015 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.04.005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractAimsWomen show higher frequency of most painful disorders. This is usually explained that endogenous pain modulation pathways, which affect incoming nociceptive signals, act differently in women and men, but psycho-social factors are likelytoinfluence as well. Ghanaian women suffer different disabilities that may lead to severe pain. The hard climatic conditions and the hard physical toil in work exert untold injuries. How do women in Ghana cope with painful disorders, and do they show certain behavioural pattern during diagnosis and treatments?MethodsThe study used in-depth interviews with health care providers to accomplish its aim. The “snowball effect” was added by which those interviewed aided us to find other prospective interviewee. In qualitative methodology, such an approach can be adopted to enable the researcher acquire relevant data with help from respondents.Practitioners were askedtoreflectontheir experiences from meeting women with severe pain as their patients. Seven practitioners, four female and three male, were interviewed.ResultsBy talking spontaneously about pain, women cope with painful disorders. This ensures easy diagnoses and treatments. The majority of women report their severe pain disabilities freely as against a smaller group who behave differently.The other group has explored other practitioners and have been unsuccessful. They are afraid to reveal their situations openly. Others test the skills of the practitioners whether they could perform efficient diagnoses. This strengthens patients’ faith and ability to be cured. In behavioural terms, inability to report severe pain stem from comorbid depressive symptoms (timidity-shyness, over-worried/confusion, distraction), lack of trust-expectant faith, thought of practitioner’s omniscient power, threat of practitioner’s knowledge (patient’s wrongs and evil thoughts), religious affiliation-constraints, etc. Women cope and show more positive attitudes than men; they expect practitioners to be in careful control.ConclusionsGhanaian women deal with their severe pains in meaningful manner by talking spontaneously about them. They show their willingness to be helped during diagnosis. Only few patients are not spontaneous, and are due to the condition of the mind and uncertainty with previous treatment encounters.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial