Polymorphism in the μ-opioid receptor gene OPRM1 A118G —An example of the enigma of genetic variability behind chronic pain syndromes

Polymorphism in the μ-opioid receptor gene OPRM1 A118G —An example of the enigma of genetic... In this number of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Ulrika Heddini et al. [1] observed that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variability in the OPRM1 A118G (rs1799971) was related to chronic pain from vestibulodynia. The same A-allele in the OPRM1 A118G that increased risk for vestibulodynia was also related to higher experimental pain sensitivity. Women with vestibulodynia also had higher levels of plasma concentrations of the endogenous opioid beta-endorphin. Thus, in this study the evidence suggest that the G allele should protect against this sort of chronic pain.1OPRM1 A118G in experimental studiesThe influence from genetic variability on pain perception and opioid efficacy is not to be disputed. Common clinical experience is that patients vary, and state of the art twin studies have demonstrated the inheritability of both pain perception and opioid efficacy [2,3]. Obviously, the gene coding for the OPRM1 receptor is one of the candidate genes for pain and opioid efficacy. The most studied of the 43 SNPs identified by Hoehe et al. within the OPRM1 gene is the OPRM1 A118G [4]. This SNP altered experimental effects from beta-endorphin [5], and early human experimental studies by Lotsch et al. [6] showed that subjects carrying one or two copies of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Polymorphism in the μ-opioid receptor gene OPRM1 A118G —An example of the enigma of genetic variability behind chronic pain syndromes

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2013 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2013.11.006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this number of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Ulrika Heddini et al. [1] observed that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variability in the OPRM1 A118G (rs1799971) was related to chronic pain from vestibulodynia. The same A-allele in the OPRM1 A118G that increased risk for vestibulodynia was also related to higher experimental pain sensitivity. Women with vestibulodynia also had higher levels of plasma concentrations of the endogenous opioid beta-endorphin. Thus, in this study the evidence suggest that the G allele should protect against this sort of chronic pain.1OPRM1 A118G in experimental studiesThe influence from genetic variability on pain perception and opioid efficacy is not to be disputed. Common clinical experience is that patients vary, and state of the art twin studies have demonstrated the inheritability of both pain perception and opioid efficacy [2,3]. Obviously, the gene coding for the OPRM1 receptor is one of the candidate genes for pain and opioid efficacy. The most studied of the 43 SNPs identified by Hoehe et al. within the OPRM1 gene is the OPRM1 A118G [4]. This SNP altered experimental effects from beta-endorphin [5], and early human experimental studies by Lotsch et al. [6] showed that subjects carrying one or two copies of

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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