Phytochemical analysis of Myrtus communis plant: Conventional versus microwave assisted-extraction procedures

Phytochemical analysis of Myrtus communis plant: Conventional versus microwave... AbstractBackgroundMyrtle (Myrtus communis L) may constitute an interesting dietary source of health protective compounds. Microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) of total phenolic compounds (TPC) from myrtle leaf, stems, pericarp, and seeds was studied and the results were compared with those of the conventional method extraction (CME) in terms of extraction time.MethodsExtraction yield/efficiency and antioxidant activity were measured using radical scavenging assay (DPPH•) and reducing power.ResultsThe results show that the MAE was higher in terms of saving energy, extraction time (62 s) and extraction efficiency of bioactive compound compared to CME (2 h). Leaf presented the optimum content of total phenols (250 mg GAE.g−1 DW) and flavonoids (13.65 mg GAE.g−1 DW). However, the anthocyanin content was most important in pericarp extract (176.50±2.17 mg Cyd-3-glu g−1 DW). The antioxidant activity was important in all parts, mainly in leaves. The results indicated that appropriate microwave treatment could be an efficient process to phenolic compounds recovery and thus, better the antioxidant activity of myrtle extract.ConclusionsPrincipal component analysis (PCA) applied to the experimental data shows that the distribution of the myrtle phenolic compounds depended on their plant part localization as well as the extraction method. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine de Gruyter

Phytochemical analysis of Myrtus communis plant: Conventional versus microwave assisted-extraction procedures

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
1553-3840
eISSN
1553-3840
D.O.I.
10.1515/jcim-2016-0098
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackgroundMyrtle (Myrtus communis L) may constitute an interesting dietary source of health protective compounds. Microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) of total phenolic compounds (TPC) from myrtle leaf, stems, pericarp, and seeds was studied and the results were compared with those of the conventional method extraction (CME) in terms of extraction time.MethodsExtraction yield/efficiency and antioxidant activity were measured using radical scavenging assay (DPPH•) and reducing power.ResultsThe results show that the MAE was higher in terms of saving energy, extraction time (62 s) and extraction efficiency of bioactive compound compared to CME (2 h). Leaf presented the optimum content of total phenols (250 mg GAE.g−1 DW) and flavonoids (13.65 mg GAE.g−1 DW). However, the anthocyanin content was most important in pericarp extract (176.50±2.17 mg Cyd-3-glu g−1 DW). The antioxidant activity was important in all parts, mainly in leaves. The results indicated that appropriate microwave treatment could be an efficient process to phenolic compounds recovery and thus, better the antioxidant activity of myrtle extract.ConclusionsPrincipal component analysis (PCA) applied to the experimental data shows that the distribution of the myrtle phenolic compounds depended on their plant part localization as well as the extraction method.

Journal

Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicinede Gruyter

Published: Jun 10, 2017

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