Physiological responses of Enhalus acoroides to osmotic stress

Physiological responses of Enhalus acoroides to osmotic stress AbstractThis study aims to examine photophysiological and osmotic responses in seedlings of the seagrass Enhalus acoroides after exposure to different salinity levels. Seagrass seedlings were grown for 20 days in control (salinity 30), hyposaline (salinity 10 and 20) and hypersaline (salinity 40 and 50) conditions. The present study showed that both hypo- and hypersaline conditions affected the photophysiology of E. acoroides seedlings, reducing the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm) and total chlorophyll content. The photosynthetic system appeared to be more sensitive to hyposaline than to hypersaline conditions as shown by immediate declines in Fv/Fm and total chlorophyll content. Hyposaline conditions increased the water content in roots. The increase in tissue Na+ content induced by hypersalinity did not affect photosynthetic integrity and was more pronounced in leaves than in roots. It is concluded that the ionic homeostasis of E. acoroides seedlings is less affected by short-term hypersalinity than by hyposalinity. The K+/Na+ ratios in leaves with hypersalinity decreased by 20 days after treatment. Additionally, the photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm and total chlorophyll content) is highly sensitive to salinity shifts and can be used as a marker for short-term acclimation to salinity stress in this seagrass species. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Botanica Marina de Gruyter

Physiological responses of Enhalus acoroides to osmotic stress

Loading next page...
 
/lp/degruyter/physiological-responses-of-enhalus-acoroides-to-osmotic-stress-gdEz10SgE5
Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
©2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
1437-4323
eISSN
1437-4323
D.O.I.
10.1515/bot-2017-0108
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis study aims to examine photophysiological and osmotic responses in seedlings of the seagrass Enhalus acoroides after exposure to different salinity levels. Seagrass seedlings were grown for 20 days in control (salinity 30), hyposaline (salinity 10 and 20) and hypersaline (salinity 40 and 50) conditions. The present study showed that both hypo- and hypersaline conditions affected the photophysiology of E. acoroides seedlings, reducing the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm) and total chlorophyll content. The photosynthetic system appeared to be more sensitive to hyposaline than to hypersaline conditions as shown by immediate declines in Fv/Fm and total chlorophyll content. Hyposaline conditions increased the water content in roots. The increase in tissue Na+ content induced by hypersalinity did not affect photosynthetic integrity and was more pronounced in leaves than in roots. It is concluded that the ionic homeostasis of E. acoroides seedlings is less affected by short-term hypersalinity than by hyposalinity. The K+/Na+ ratios in leaves with hypersalinity decreased by 20 days after treatment. Additionally, the photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm and total chlorophyll content) is highly sensitive to salinity shifts and can be used as a marker for short-term acclimation to salinity stress in this seagrass species.

Journal

Botanica Marinade Gruyter

Published: Jun 27, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off