Patients with chronic neck-pain after trauma do not differ in type of symptoms and signs, but suffer more than patients with chronic neck pain without a traumatic onset

Patients with chronic neck-pain after trauma do not differ in type of symptoms and signs, but... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Inge Ris and co-workers publish an interesting study comparing chronic neck pain patients whose pain condition started after a traumatic event (n = 120)– with chronic neck pain patients without an obvious traumatic event (n = 80), their hypothesis being that these two groups of patients could have differing symptoms and signs so that the traumatic neck pain patients more easily could be recognized as such [1].Patients with at least 6 months pain and at least a moderate disability (Neck Disability Index) had a thorough physical examination and they reported on several self-evaluation questionnaires covering physical and psychological symptoms. The traumatic onset neck pain patients had duration of pain of 88 months, compared with 138 months in the non-trauma-group, still the patients with a traumatic onset of neck pain had worse signs and symptoms than the non-trauma group of neck pain patients: Neck muscles performed worse, they reported poorer quality of life, more depressive symptoms, and had a worse score on the Neck Disability Index. Pressure pain thresholds were lower in the neck area.In spite of these statistically highly significant group differences, they concluded that they could not find any specific symptoms or signs in individual trauma-onset neck pain patients that were clinically different from the no-trauma-onset neck pain patients. The group differences were in degrees of symptoms, the traumatic onset neck pain patients clearly suffering more and having more severe disabilities from their neck pain.Clearly, 120 patients with chronic neck pain after trauma, in the literature and in clinical jargon also called patients with WAD – Whiplash Associated Disorders [2], or patients with NAD – Neck and Associated Disorders [1,3], did not differ in type, but in degrees, of symptoms and impairments from 80 patients with chronic neck pain without traumatic onset.Thus, their main conclusion with important implications for patients with neck pain and those trying to treat and help them is that you cannot from the symptoms-presentation and the degree of physical impairments and psychological sequelae determine that the neck pain is caused by trauma or not.Conflict of interest: None declared.References[1]Ris I, Juul-Kristensen B, Boyle E, Kongsted A, Manniche C, Søgaard K. Chronic neck pain patients with traumatic or non-traumatic onset: differences in characteristics. A cross-sectional study. Scand J pain 2017;14:1–8.10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.08.00828850421http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000391262000001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=b7bc2757938ac7a7a821505f8243d9f3RisIJuul-KristensenBBoyleEKongstedAMannicheCSøgaardK.Chronic neck pain patients with traumatic or non-traumatic onset: differences in characteristics. A cross-sectional studyScand J pain20171418[2]Westergren H, Freeman MD, Malmström E-M. The whiplash enigma: still searching for answers. Scand J Pain 2014;5:226–8.WestergrenHFreemanMDMalmströmE-M.The whiplash enigma: still searching for answersScand J Pain201452268[3]Côté PSH, Ameis A, Carroll L, Mior M, Nordin M, the OPTIMa Collaboration. Enabling recovery from common traffic injuries: a focus on the injured person. Ontario: Rehabilitation, U-CCftSoDPa; 2015.CôtéPSHAmeisACarrollLMiorMNordinM the OPTIMa Collaboration. Enabling recovery from common traffic injuries: a focus on the injured person Ontario Rehabilitation, U-CCftSoDPa 2015 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Patients with chronic neck-pain after trauma do not differ in type of symptoms and signs, but suffer more than patients with chronic neck pain without a traumatic onset

Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/degruyter/patients-with-chronic-neck-pain-after-trauma-do-not-differ-in-type-of-VygObRuDzw
Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.11.014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Inge Ris and co-workers publish an interesting study comparing chronic neck pain patients whose pain condition started after a traumatic event (n = 120)– with chronic neck pain patients without an obvious traumatic event (n = 80), their hypothesis being that these two groups of patients could have differing symptoms and signs so that the traumatic neck pain patients more easily could be recognized as such [1].Patients with at least 6 months pain and at least a moderate disability (Neck Disability Index) had a thorough physical examination and they reported on several self-evaluation questionnaires covering physical and psychological symptoms. The traumatic onset neck pain patients had duration of pain of 88 months, compared with 138 months in the non-trauma-group, still the patients with a traumatic onset of neck pain had worse signs and symptoms than the non-trauma group of neck pain patients: Neck muscles performed worse, they reported poorer quality of life, more depressive symptoms, and had a worse score on the Neck Disability Index. Pressure pain thresholds were lower in the neck area.In spite of these statistically highly significant group differences, they concluded that they could not find any specific symptoms or signs in individual trauma-onset neck pain patients that were clinically different from the no-trauma-onset neck pain patients. The group differences were in degrees of symptoms, the traumatic onset neck pain patients clearly suffering more and having more severe disabilities from their neck pain.Clearly, 120 patients with chronic neck pain after trauma, in the literature and in clinical jargon also called patients with WAD – Whiplash Associated Disorders [2], or patients with NAD – Neck and Associated Disorders [1,3], did not differ in type, but in degrees, of symptoms and impairments from 80 patients with chronic neck pain without traumatic onset.Thus, their main conclusion with important implications for patients with neck pain and those trying to treat and help them is that you cannot from the symptoms-presentation and the degree of physical impairments and psychological sequelae determine that the neck pain is caused by trauma or not.Conflict of interest: None declared.References[1]Ris I, Juul-Kristensen B, Boyle E, Kongsted A, Manniche C, Søgaard K. Chronic neck pain patients with traumatic or non-traumatic onset: differences in characteristics. A cross-sectional study. Scand J pain 2017;14:1–8.10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.08.00828850421http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000391262000001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=b7bc2757938ac7a7a821505f8243d9f3RisIJuul-KristensenBBoyleEKongstedAMannicheCSøgaardK.Chronic neck pain patients with traumatic or non-traumatic onset: differences in characteristics. A cross-sectional studyScand J pain20171418[2]Westergren H, Freeman MD, Malmström E-M. The whiplash enigma: still searching for answers. Scand J Pain 2014;5:226–8.WestergrenHFreemanMDMalmströmE-M.The whiplash enigma: still searching for answersScand J Pain201452268[3]Côté PSH, Ameis A, Carroll L, Mior M, Nordin M, the OPTIMa Collaboration. Enabling recovery from common traffic injuries: a focus on the injured person. Ontario: Rehabilitation, U-CCftSoDPa; 2015.CôtéPSHAmeisACarrollLMiorMNordinM the OPTIMa Collaboration. Enabling recovery from common traffic injuries: a focus on the injured person Ontario Rehabilitation, U-CCftSoDPa 2015

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 2017

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off