Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) are sensitive outcome-variables in patients with chronic pain: Importance of self-efficacy

Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) are sensitive outcome-variables in patients with chronic pain:... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Kelleher and co-authors explore the role of “self-efficacy” in patients with both breast and gastro-intestinal (GI) cancer and how self-efficacy relates to pain, symptom severity, distress and physical and emotional functioning [1]. The introduction of a Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO) questionnaire on self-efficacy in a clinical setting for cancer patients is rather unique and is important. A secondary outcome for the study was to establish if an electronic testing paradigm was acceptable for patients and compare it to a standard paper-and-pencil testing paradigm in this cancer population.1What is self-efficacyA definition of “self-efficacy” “self-efficacy is the extent or strength of one’s belief in one’s own ability to complete tasks and reach goals.” Self-efficacy is a label that is akin to many others in psychology. Related terms that have been researched in various pain and depression studies, including those in patients with cancer, are “helplessness” [2], “locus of control” [3], “fear-avoidance” [4], and “catastrophizing𠇍 [5] that usually focus on the negative side of self-efficacy and are predictors for increased pain, depression and pain behaviour after injury and surgery and also are associated with poor outcomes for treatment for acute and chronic pain. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) are sensitive outcome-variables in patients with chronic pain: Importance of self-efficacy

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.036
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Kelleher and co-authors explore the role of “self-efficacy” in patients with both breast and gastro-intestinal (GI) cancer and how self-efficacy relates to pain, symptom severity, distress and physical and emotional functioning [1]. The introduction of a Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO) questionnaire on self-efficacy in a clinical setting for cancer patients is rather unique and is important. A secondary outcome for the study was to establish if an electronic testing paradigm was acceptable for patients and compare it to a standard paper-and-pencil testing paradigm in this cancer population.1What is self-efficacyA definition of “self-efficacy” “self-efficacy is the extent or strength of one’s belief in one’s own ability to complete tasks and reach goals.” Self-efficacy is a label that is akin to many others in psychology. Related terms that have been researched in various pain and depression studies, including those in patients with cancer, are “helplessness” [2], “locus of control” [3], “fear-avoidance” [4], and “catastrophizing𠇍 [5] that usually focus on the negative side of self-efficacy and are predictors for increased pain, depression and pain behaviour after injury and surgery and also are associated with poor outcomes for treatment for acute and chronic pain.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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