Painful diabetic polyneuropathy and quality of life in Danish type 2 diabetic patients

Painful diabetic polyneuropathy and quality of life in Danish type 2 diabetic patients Scientific presentations at the 2017 Annual Meeting / Scandinavian Journal of Pain 16 (2017) 165–188vascularization and other lncRNAs as predictive indicators for thedevelopment of chronic postoperative pain.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.025Painful diabetic polyneuropathy and quality oflife in Danish type 2 diabetic patientsSandra Sif Gylfadottir a,∗ , Diana HedevangChristensen b , Sia Kromann Nicolaisen b , ReimarWernich Thomsen b , Jens Steen Nielsen c ,Mustapha Itani d , Søren Sindrup d , TroelsStaehelin Jensen a , Nanna Brix Finnerup aaDanish Pain Research Center, Department ofClinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus,Denmarkb Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Departmentof Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus,Denmarkc Danish Center for Strategic Research in Type 2Diabetes, Odense, Denmarkd Department of Neurology, Odense UniversityHospital, Odense, DenmarkE-mail address: sifgyl@clin.au.dk (S.S. Gylfadottir).Background and aims: Painful polyneuropathy (PPN) is a disabling complication of diabetes. This study aims to determine itsprevalence and relationship with Quality of Life (QoL) in a nationwide prospective cohort of incident recently diagnosed Danish type2 diabetic patients.Methods: We sent a detailed questionnaire on neuropathy,pain and QoL to 6726 patients prospectively enrolled from general practitioners and hospital specialist outpatient clinics into theDanish Centre for Strategic Research in Type 2 Diabetes (DD2)cohort. Patients who reported pain in both feet and a score ≥3on the Douleur Neuropathique (DN4) questionnaire were considered to have possible PPN. QoL and pain intensity were measuredon a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0–10). The Michigan NeuropathyScreening Instrument (MNSI) was used to assess neuropathy.Results: A total of 5371 (79.8%) returned a complete questionnaire. 848 (15.8%) recently diagnosed type 2 diabetic patientsreported pain in both feet. Of the 619 patients with pain who completed the DN4 questionnaire, 404 (65.2%) had a DN4 score ≥3,corresponding to a prevalence in the total population of possiblePPN of 10.3%. Mean pain intensity was 5.2 (SD 2.2) and 89% had aMNSI score ≥3. Patients with possible PPN had a substantially lowerQoL score than those without PPN (median QoL score 6 versus 8(p < 0.001)), also when correcting for MNSI score.Conclusions: Ten percent of newly diagnosed type 2 diabeticpatients in Denmark had possible PPN. Patients with PPN had lowerQoL than patients without PPN.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.026“What about me?”: A qualitative explorativestudy on perspectives of spouses living withcomplex chronic pain patientsL. Thrysøe Hansen a,b,∗ , L.I. Nielsen a,b , P.Gazerani b , L. Petrini baZealand University Hospital in Køge, DenmarkFaculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, DenmarkE-mail address: ltg@mail.dk (L.T. Hansen).Aims: Being a close relative of a chronic pain patient affectsfamily life. No study has been carried out in Denmark to explorerelatives’ life experiences and challenges while living with complexb173chronic pain patients. Hence, the aim of the study was to investigate the experiences of living with chronic pain patients fromtheir spouses’ perspectives. In particular, this study focused on howspouses describe: (i) their everyday tasks and roles as a spouse; (ii)the types of changes and challenges that the pain condition bringsinto their partnership lives; (iii) a gender difference in these experiences; and (iv) the type of help they wish to receive from thehealthcare system.Methods: Two focus group interviews were conducted in Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Køge, including a total of 11 spouses (6men). The spouses were contacted via their partners who werereferred to public pain clinics. Focus group interview was chosenbecause is a suitable method for exploratory studies. The approachwas phenomenological and transcriptions of interview recordswere used for analysis.Results: Eight categories emerged from the data analysis: psychological burden, physical burden, the pain invisibility, roles, loss,worries concerning medicine, self-care, and needs concerning helpand support. The differences between gender were vague. Spousesfor whom the patient pain condition was a new situation (<1 year)appeared to worry more.Conclusions: The study demonstrated that the spouses’ liveswere dramatically affected. They had to support the family financially, do most of the household chores, be optimistic, a parent, anda pain care giver. The spouses experienced daily worries about several points including pain medicine by the patients. This study alsohighlighted an essential need for psychological support for copingwith the changing life situation, the point that is currently neglectedto a great extent.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.027Increased postural stiffness in patients withknee osteoarthritis who are highly sensitizedR.P. Hirata a,∗ , S.T. Skou a,b,c,d , O. Simonsen a,b,e , S.Rasmussen a,b,e , T. Graven-Nielsen faCenter for Sensory-Motor Interaction (SMI),Aalborg, Denmarkb Orthopedic Surgery Research Unit, AalborgUniversity Hospital, Aalborg, Denmarkc Research Unit for Musculoskeletal Function andPhysiotherapy, Institute of Sports Science andClinical Biomechanics, University of SouthernDenmark, Odense, Denmarkd Department of Physiotherapy and OccupationalTherapy, Næstved-Slagelse-Ringsted Hospitals,Region Zealand, Slagelse, Denmarke Department of Clinical Medicine, AalborgUniversity, Aalborg, Denmarkf Center for Neuroplasticity and Pain (CNAP), SMI,Aalborg, DenmarkE-mail address: rirata@hst.aau.dk (R.P. Hirata).Aims: To evaluate the effect of widespread pain sensitization onpostural stability during quiet standing tasks in patients with kneeosteoarthritis.Methods: Patients (56) stood quietly on a force platform for1 min in 4 conditions (each repeated 3 times): (i) firm surface (FS)with open eyes (OE), (ii) FS with closed eyes (CE), (iii) soft foamsurface (SS) with OE, and (iv) SS with CE. Postural stability wasquantified by Center of Pressure (CoP) variables extracted fromthe force platform. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), were assessedbilaterally with a handheld pressure algometer (1 cm2 probe) at:(i) four sites in the knee region (3 cm medial to the midpoint ofthe medial edge of the patella; 2 cm proximal to the superior edge http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

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De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.026
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Abstract

Scientific presentations at the 2017 Annual Meeting / Scandinavian Journal of Pain 16 (2017) 165–188vascularization and other lncRNAs as predictive indicators for thedevelopment of chronic postoperative pain.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.025Painful diabetic polyneuropathy and quality oflife in Danish type 2 diabetic patientsSandra Sif Gylfadottir a,∗ , Diana HedevangChristensen b , Sia Kromann Nicolaisen b , ReimarWernich Thomsen b , Jens Steen Nielsen c ,Mustapha Itani d , Søren Sindrup d , TroelsStaehelin Jensen a , Nanna Brix Finnerup aaDanish Pain Research Center, Department ofClinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus,Denmarkb Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Departmentof Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus,Denmarkc Danish Center for Strategic Research in Type 2Diabetes, Odense, Denmarkd Department of Neurology, Odense UniversityHospital, Odense, DenmarkE-mail address: sifgyl@clin.au.dk (S.S. Gylfadottir).Background and aims: Painful polyneuropathy (PPN) is a disabling complication of diabetes. This study aims to determine itsprevalence and relationship with Quality of Life (QoL) in a nationwide prospective cohort of incident recently diagnosed Danish type2 diabetic patients.Methods: We sent a detailed questionnaire on neuropathy,pain and QoL to 6726 patients prospectively enrolled from general practitioners and hospital specialist outpatient clinics into theDanish Centre for Strategic Research in Type 2 Diabetes (DD2)cohort. Patients who reported pain in both feet and a score ≥3on the Douleur Neuropathique (DN4) questionnaire were considered to have possible PPN. QoL and pain intensity were measuredon a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0–10). The Michigan NeuropathyScreening Instrument (MNSI) was used to assess neuropathy.Results: A total of 5371 (79.8%) returned a complete questionnaire. 848 (15.8%) recently diagnosed type 2 diabetic patientsreported pain in both feet. Of the 619 patients with pain who completed the DN4 questionnaire, 404 (65.2%) had a DN4 score ≥3,corresponding to a prevalence in the total population of possiblePPN of 10.3%. Mean pain intensity was 5.2 (SD 2.2) and 89% had aMNSI score ≥3. Patients with possible PPN had a substantially lowerQoL score than those without PPN (median QoL score 6 versus 8(p < 0.001)), also when correcting for MNSI score.Conclusions: Ten percent of newly diagnosed type 2 diabeticpatients in Denmark had possible PPN. Patients with PPN had lowerQoL than patients without PPN.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.026“What about me?”: A qualitative explorativestudy on perspectives of spouses living withcomplex chronic pain patientsL. Thrysøe Hansen a,b,∗ , L.I. Nielsen a,b , P.Gazerani b , L. Petrini baZealand University Hospital in Køge, DenmarkFaculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, DenmarkE-mail address: ltg@mail.dk (L.T. Hansen).Aims: Being a close relative of a chronic pain patient affectsfamily life. No study has been carried out in Denmark to explorerelatives’ life experiences and challenges while living with complexb173chronic pain patients. Hence, the aim of the study was to investigate the experiences of living with chronic pain patients fromtheir spouses’ perspectives. In particular, this study focused on howspouses describe: (i) their everyday tasks and roles as a spouse; (ii)the types of changes and challenges that the pain condition bringsinto their partnership lives; (iii) a gender difference in these experiences; and (iv) the type of help they wish to receive from thehealthcare system.Methods: Two focus group interviews were conducted in Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Køge, including a total of 11 spouses (6men). The spouses were contacted via their partners who werereferred to public pain clinics. Focus group interview was chosenbecause is a suitable method for exploratory studies. The approachwas phenomenological and transcriptions of interview recordswere used for analysis.Results: Eight categories emerged from the data analysis: psychological burden, physical burden, the pain invisibility, roles, loss,worries concerning medicine, self-care, and needs concerning helpand support. The differences between gender were vague. Spousesfor whom the patient pain condition was a new situation (<1 year)appeared to worry more.Conclusions: The study demonstrated that the spouses’ liveswere dramatically affected. They had to support the family financially, do most of the household chores, be optimistic, a parent, anda pain care giver. The spouses experienced daily worries about several points including pain medicine by the patients. This study alsohighlighted an essential need for psychological support for copingwith the changing life situation, the point that is currently neglectedto a great extent.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.04.027Increased postural stiffness in patients withknee osteoarthritis who are highly sensitizedR.P. Hirata a,∗ , S.T. Skou a,b,c,d , O. Simonsen a,b,e , S.Rasmussen a,b,e , T. Graven-Nielsen faCenter for Sensory-Motor Interaction (SMI),Aalborg, Denmarkb Orthopedic Surgery Research Unit, AalborgUniversity Hospital, Aalborg, Denmarkc Research Unit for Musculoskeletal Function andPhysiotherapy, Institute of Sports Science andClinical Biomechanics, University of SouthernDenmark, Odense, Denmarkd Department of Physiotherapy and OccupationalTherapy, Næstved-Slagelse-Ringsted Hospitals,Region Zealand, Slagelse, Denmarke Department of Clinical Medicine, AalborgUniversity, Aalborg, Denmarkf Center for Neuroplasticity and Pain (CNAP), SMI,Aalborg, DenmarkE-mail address: rirata@hst.aau.dk (R.P. Hirata).Aims: To evaluate the effect of widespread pain sensitization onpostural stability during quiet standing tasks in patients with kneeosteoarthritis.Methods: Patients (56) stood quietly on a force platform for1 min in 4 conditions (each repeated 3 times): (i) firm surface (FS)with open eyes (OE), (ii) FS with closed eyes (CE), (iii) soft foamsurface (SS) with OE, and (iv) SS with CE. Postural stability wasquantified by Center of Pressure (CoP) variables extracted fromthe force platform. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs), were assessedbilaterally with a handheld pressure algometer (1 cm2 probe) at:(i) four sites in the knee region (3 cm medial to the midpoint ofthe medial edge of the patella; 2 cm proximal to the superior edge

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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