Pain rehabilitation with language interpreter, a multicenter development project

Pain rehabilitation with language interpreter, a multicenter development project Abstracts / Scandinavian Journal of Pain 12 (2016) 117–124well as an up-regulation of HER3 in the DRG were demonstratedafter application of NP onto the dorsal nerve roots.Conclusion: Our findings suggest that EREG and signalingthrough its receptors may be involved in pain hypersensitivity andother sensory abnormalities after disc herniation.Trait-anxiety and pain intensity predictsymptoms related to dysfunctional breathing(DB) in patients with chronic painhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.018aPain rehabilitation with language interpreter, amulticenter development projectM. Löfgren a,b,∗ , K. Uhlin a,b , E. Persson c , B.-M.Stålnacke a,b , M. Rivano-Fischer caDepartment of Clinical Sciences, KarolinskaInstitutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Swedenb Department of Rehabilitation Medicine DanderydUniversity Hospital, Stockholm, Swedenc Health Sciences Center, Lund University andDepartment of Pain Rehabilitation Medicine, SkaneUniversity Hospital, Lund, SwedenE-mail address: monika.lofgren@ki.se (M. Löfgren).Aims: To describe patients with persistent pain participatingin multimodal rehabilitation with language interpreter (MMRI)with regard to demographic data, pain, anxiety, depression, fearof movement, health related quality of life before and after rehabilitation.Methods: The university rehabilitation departments in Lundand Stockholm developed multimodal rehabilitation programmesfor patients who cannot participate in ordinary programmes due toinsufficient knowledge in Swedish. From 2014 to 2015, 50 patientsparticipated in the MMRI. Data was collected at admission and discharge with instruments from the Swedish quality registry for painrehabilitation. The assessments included health related quality oflife (EQ5D), anxiety and depression (HADS), fear of movements(TSK), disability (PDI).Preliminary results: Fifty patients participated in MMRI.Seventy-eight percent were women, and 88% were born outsideEurope. Compared to patients participating in Swedish regularrehabilitation programmes (MMR), the level of education was low,44% had finished high school (55% in MMR in Sweden) and 8%university (27% in MMR in Sweden). Also the distribution of paindiffered; in MMRI 40% reported pain with varying localization compared to 33% in MMR. Both groups were frequent health careseekers, even though MMRI’s patients reported a higher frequencyof visits than MMR regular patients; 94% of MMRI’s patients compared to 70% MMR patients were seeking physicians more than 4times due to pain during the previous year. Both groups report verylow health related quality of life. In the MMRI group, at admission,the EQ5Dindex was 0.088 (md) (MMR 0.157). This can be comparedwith 0.83, the value for the Swedish norm population.Conclusions: Patients participating in MMRI, compared topatients participating in MMR, reported poorer health, higher rateof visit to physicians due to pain and less higher education thanother, Swedish speaking pain patients attending to the country painprogrammes.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.019123L.S. Nævestad a,b,c,∗ , S. Halvorsen a,b,c , G.Kvarstein a,b,cOrthopedic Rehabilitation Unit, Oslo UniversityHospital, Norwayb National Advisory Unit on Rehabilitation inRheumatology, Department of Rheumatology,Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Norwayc Department of Pain Management, Oslo UniversityHospital, NorwayE-mail address: lsnevest@ous-hf.no (L.S. Nævestad).Aims: The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the occurrence of symptoms related to dysfunctionalbreathing (DB) in chronic pain patients and to examine factorsassociated with these symptoms.Methods: A questionnaire was sent to 527 adults referred to outpatient pain clinics at Oslo university hospital. The questionnaireprovided demographic data, Brief Pain Inventory, Spielberger statetrait anxiety inventory, and Nijmegen questionnaire (NQ). Multipleregression analyses were performed using SPSS.Results: A total of 108 patients (20%) responded to the questionnaire and was included. Mean age was 49 years and two thirdof the participants were female. More than four out of ten had aNQ score ≥23 (a conservative cutoff value for DB). The median NQscore in the sample was 19. Trait-anxiety (Beta = .412, p < 0.001) andmaximal pain intensity during the past week (Beta = .264, p = 0.004)predicted symptoms related to DB even when controlling for ageand gender.Conclusions: The study shows that a large portion of patientswith chronic pain experiences symptoms that have been associatedwith hyperventilation and DB and at a higher level than previouslyreported. Although trait-anxiety is a strong predictor for symptomsrelated to DB, we find it interesting that maximal pain intensityduring the last week also was associated with these symptoms.The cross-sectional design, low response rate, and lack of diagnoseslimit our ability to draw conclusions about causal relationship andextrapolate to a larger populations of patients with chronic pain.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.020Emla® -cream as pain relief duringpneumococcal vaccinationB. Olsson Duse a,∗ , Y. Sporrong b , K. Skoglund c , M.Bartocci daSörmland County Council, Eskilstuna, SwedenSachs’ Children and Youth Hospital, Stockholm,Swedenc Mälardalen University, Västerås, Swedend Department of Neonatology, Karolinska UniversityHospital, Stockholm, SwedenE-mail address: bod257@hotmail.com (B. Olsson Duse).bBackground: Pneumococcal vaccination for children was introduced in Sweden in 2009. For more than two decades, previousstudies have shown that anesthetic cream Emla® has good effectin reducing vaccine-related pain. Even today health care workersclaim “children forget quickly, and it (the pain) goes away”, thisignorance causes pain in children not treated or treated in one forthe child and his guardians satisfactorily way.Purpose: The purpose of this intervention study was to compare the effect of Emla® cream for pain relief or no pain relief http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Pain rehabilitation with language interpreter, a multicenter development project

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De Gruyter
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© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
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1877-8860
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1877-8879
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10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.019
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Abstract

Abstracts / Scandinavian Journal of Pain 12 (2016) 117–124well as an up-regulation of HER3 in the DRG were demonstratedafter application of NP onto the dorsal nerve roots.Conclusion: Our findings suggest that EREG and signalingthrough its receptors may be involved in pain hypersensitivity andother sensory abnormalities after disc herniation.Trait-anxiety and pain intensity predictsymptoms related to dysfunctional breathing(DB) in patients with chronic painhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.018aPain rehabilitation with language interpreter, amulticenter development projectM. Löfgren a,b,∗ , K. Uhlin a,b , E. Persson c , B.-M.Stålnacke a,b , M. Rivano-Fischer caDepartment of Clinical Sciences, KarolinskaInstitutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Swedenb Department of Rehabilitation Medicine DanderydUniversity Hospital, Stockholm, Swedenc Health Sciences Center, Lund University andDepartment of Pain Rehabilitation Medicine, SkaneUniversity Hospital, Lund, SwedenE-mail address: monika.lofgren@ki.se (M. Löfgren).Aims: To describe patients with persistent pain participatingin multimodal rehabilitation with language interpreter (MMRI)with regard to demographic data, pain, anxiety, depression, fearof movement, health related quality of life before and after rehabilitation.Methods: The university rehabilitation departments in Lundand Stockholm developed multimodal rehabilitation programmesfor patients who cannot participate in ordinary programmes due toinsufficient knowledge in Swedish. From 2014 to 2015, 50 patientsparticipated in the MMRI. Data was collected at admission and discharge with instruments from the Swedish quality registry for painrehabilitation. The assessments included health related quality oflife (EQ5D), anxiety and depression (HADS), fear of movements(TSK), disability (PDI).Preliminary results: Fifty patients participated in MMRI.Seventy-eight percent were women, and 88% were born outsideEurope. Compared to patients participating in Swedish regularrehabilitation programmes (MMR), the level of education was low,44% had finished high school (55% in MMR in Sweden) and 8%university (27% in MMR in Sweden). Also the distribution of paindiffered; in MMRI 40% reported pain with varying localization compared to 33% in MMR. Both groups were frequent health careseekers, even though MMRI’s patients reported a higher frequencyof visits than MMR regular patients; 94% of MMRI’s patients compared to 70% MMR patients were seeking physicians more than 4times due to pain during the previous year. Both groups report verylow health related quality of life. In the MMRI group, at admission,the EQ5Dindex was 0.088 (md) (MMR 0.157). This can be comparedwith 0.83, the value for the Swedish norm population.Conclusions: Patients participating in MMRI, compared topatients participating in MMR, reported poorer health, higher rateof visit to physicians due to pain and less higher education thanother, Swedish speaking pain patients attending to the country painprogrammes.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.019123L.S. Nævestad a,b,c,∗ , S. Halvorsen a,b,c , G.Kvarstein a,b,cOrthopedic Rehabilitation Unit, Oslo UniversityHospital, Norwayb National Advisory Unit on Rehabilitation inRheumatology, Department of Rheumatology,Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Norwayc Department of Pain Management, Oslo UniversityHospital, NorwayE-mail address: lsnevest@ous-hf.no (L.S. Nævestad).Aims: The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the occurrence of symptoms related to dysfunctionalbreathing (DB) in chronic pain patients and to examine factorsassociated with these symptoms.Methods: A questionnaire was sent to 527 adults referred to outpatient pain clinics at Oslo university hospital. The questionnaireprovided demographic data, Brief Pain Inventory, Spielberger statetrait anxiety inventory, and Nijmegen questionnaire (NQ). Multipleregression analyses were performed using SPSS.Results: A total of 108 patients (20%) responded to the questionnaire and was included. Mean age was 49 years and two thirdof the participants were female. More than four out of ten had aNQ score ≥23 (a conservative cutoff value for DB). The median NQscore in the sample was 19. Trait-anxiety (Beta = .412, p < 0.001) andmaximal pain intensity during the past week (Beta = .264, p = 0.004)predicted symptoms related to DB even when controlling for ageand gender.Conclusions: The study shows that a large portion of patientswith chronic pain experiences symptoms that have been associatedwith hyperventilation and DB and at a higher level than previouslyreported. Although trait-anxiety is a strong predictor for symptomsrelated to DB, we find it interesting that maximal pain intensityduring the last week also was associated with these symptoms.The cross-sectional design, low response rate, and lack of diagnoseslimit our ability to draw conclusions about causal relationship andextrapolate to a larger populations of patients with chronic pain.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.020Emla® -cream as pain relief duringpneumococcal vaccinationB. Olsson Duse a,∗ , Y. Sporrong b , K. Skoglund c , M.Bartocci daSörmland County Council, Eskilstuna, SwedenSachs’ Children and Youth Hospital, Stockholm,Swedenc Mälardalen University, Västerås, Swedend Department of Neonatology, Karolinska UniversityHospital, Stockholm, SwedenE-mail address: bod257@hotmail.com (B. Olsson Duse).bBackground: Pneumococcal vaccination for children was introduced in Sweden in 2009. For more than two decades, previousstudies have shown that anesthetic cream Emla® has good effectin reducing vaccine-related pain. Even today health care workersclaim “children forget quickly, and it (the pain) goes away”, thisignorance causes pain in children not treated or treated in one forthe child and his guardians satisfactorily way.Purpose: The purpose of this intervention study was to compare the effect of Emla® cream for pain relief or no pain relief

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Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Jul 1, 2016

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