Pain psychology specialist training 2012–2014

Pain psychology specialist training 2012–2014 256Poster-abstracts from SASP 2013 / Scandinavian Journal of Pain 4 (2013) 255–260A3Pain treatment in rural Ghana—A qualitativestudyDesmond Ayim-Aboagye 1 , Torsten Gordh 212University of Ghana, Accra, GhanaUppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, SwedenAims: We investigated how treatment of pain was functioningamong a rural population in African context.Methods: The investigation employed the observation approachand in-depth interview approach in a rural population of about5000 inhabitants. However, at the zenith of the study 10 patientswere selected for the in-depth interview, having serious conditions,which had rendered them immobile, received a major focus in thestudy. With qualitative methods, we were capable of procuring richinformation through narratives.Results: The patients employ both biomedical practitioners andtraditional practitioners in the culture who have potent knowledgeof culture specific disabilities. Even when patients had receivedsatisfactory treatments leading to pain relief from the former practitioners, they still cherish some psychological pain, which demandthat they consult other practitioners in the culture for further treatments. Those that only receive help from the mainstream hospitalsor speciality clinics show improvement, but usually assailed by fearand excessive worry that their pains will not disappear entirely.While the younger generation patients are reluctant to reveal theseconsultations with traditional practitioners openly, the older groupfelt more positive about it and brag of having endured their ordealbecause of these consultations with those who could offer themadditional protection.Conclusion: The employment of different practitioners’ treatments alleviated these patients’ pain disabilities and psychologicalsymptoms, which were that of pain relief, psychological pain, anddeath fear. Traditional treatment of pain has a social function, andtherefore must be given attention to and recognition by biomedicaltrained doctors.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2013.07.005A4Pain psychology specialist training 2012–2014P. Soini 1 , A. Valjakka 2 , S. Tuurinkoski 3 , M.Elomaa 4 ,T. Väänänen 5 , V. Hägg 61Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, FinlandRaisio Substance Abuse and Mental Health Unit,Raisio, Finland3 The Hospital District of South Ostrobothnia,Seinäjoki, Finland4 Helsinki University Central Hospital Pain Clinic,Helsinki, Finland5 Tuusula Health Care Center, Occupational HealthCare, Tuusula, Finland6 Private Psychotherapy Practice, Espoo, Finland2Aims: The training includes learning the practical skills relatedto the psychological examination, treatment and rehabilitation ofpain patients. The completion of the training prepares for workin multiprofessional teams as a specialist in pain psychology. Ajoint project of the Finnish Association of the Study of Pain andthe Psychology Institute since 2008.Participants: Psychologists working in public, private or occupational health care, in rehabilitation or psychiatric clinics. Thefourth training group of 20 psychologists started in the spring of2012. More than 40 psychologists have already been trained in1998–2010.The structure and content of the training:Seminars: Eight seminars include 12 days of training on thetopics of pain as a psychosocial phenomenon, psychological assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of pain patients, interaction andmultiprofessional teamwork.Tutorial groups: Eight tutorial meetings of 5 students and onetutor in each group gather together in different parts of Finlandto discuss selected scientific articles, work on their professionalidentity as pain psychologists and receive supervision of clinicaland diploma work.Literature: Getting acquainted with scientific research reportson pain psychology and with vocational literature.Diploma work: Written article or a short research report on adevelopment project, experiment or a phenomenon related to painpsychology.Optional studies: Giving a lecture or training on the topic ofpain psychology to other professionals or patients, participating ina pain education organized by others, writing a report on a research,treatment or rehabilitation experiment or a book review to be published.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2013.07.006A5Pain assessment, documentation, andmanagement in a university hospitalS. Zoëga 1,2 , T. Aspelund 2 , G. Sigurdsson 1,2 , S.E.Ward 3 ,H. Sveinsdóttir 1,2 , S. Gunnarsdóttir 1,21 Landspítali – The National University Hospital ofIceland, Reykjavík, Iceland2 University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland3 University of Wisconsin, Madison, USAAims: To determine if pain is assessed, documented, and treatedin a university hospital according to recommended practice.Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study, conducted in 23medical and surgical wards in a university hospital. Participantswere patients hospitalized for at least 24 hours, ≥18 years of age,and able to participate. Data were collected from patients with aquestionnaire (APS-POQ-R), from their medical records, and fromTherapy® , the hospital medication system.Results: The response rate was 73%. Participants (N = 308) meanage was 67.5 years (SD = 17.4), 50.5% were women. Pain prevalence in the past 24 h was 83.1% and severe pain was experiencedby 34.5%. Descriptions of pain were documented for 60.7%. Standardized methods of assessment were used in 11.6% of patients,other forms of documentation included descriptions as “no paincomplaints”, and “patient received 2 Panodil”. The majority ofpatients (66.8%) were prescribed pain medications and 34.0% ofpatients used non-pharmacological methods to treat their pain. Thepain management index (PMI = prescribed pain medication – worstpain severity) was negative for 38.6% indicating insufficient treatment. The PMI was more favorable in surgical compared to medicalpatients, 2 (6, N = 306) = 17.81, p = 0.007.Conclusions: Pain was both prevalent and severe. Althoughsome form of documentation of pain was recorded for the majorityof patients, pain was rarely assessed with standardized methods.Many patients did not receive adequate treatment. There is a need http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Pain psychology specialist training 2012–2014

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De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2013 Scandiavian Association for the Study of Pain
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1877-8860
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1877-8879
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10.1016/j.sjpain.2013.07.006
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Abstract

256Poster-abstracts from SASP 2013 / Scandinavian Journal of Pain 4 (2013) 255–260A3Pain treatment in rural Ghana—A qualitativestudyDesmond Ayim-Aboagye 1 , Torsten Gordh 212University of Ghana, Accra, GhanaUppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, SwedenAims: We investigated how treatment of pain was functioningamong a rural population in African context.Methods: The investigation employed the observation approachand in-depth interview approach in a rural population of about5000 inhabitants. However, at the zenith of the study 10 patientswere selected for the in-depth interview, having serious conditions,which had rendered them immobile, received a major focus in thestudy. With qualitative methods, we were capable of procuring richinformation through narratives.Results: The patients employ both biomedical practitioners andtraditional practitioners in the culture who have potent knowledgeof culture specific disabilities. Even when patients had receivedsatisfactory treatments leading to pain relief from the former practitioners, they still cherish some psychological pain, which demandthat they consult other practitioners in the culture for further treatments. Those that only receive help from the mainstream hospitalsor speciality clinics show improvement, but usually assailed by fearand excessive worry that their pains will not disappear entirely.While the younger generation patients are reluctant to reveal theseconsultations with traditional practitioners openly, the older groupfelt more positive about it and brag of having endured their ordealbecause of these consultations with those who could offer themadditional protection.Conclusion: The employment of different practitioners’ treatments alleviated these patients’ pain disabilities and psychologicalsymptoms, which were that of pain relief, psychological pain, anddeath fear. Traditional treatment of pain has a social function, andtherefore must be given attention to and recognition by biomedicaltrained doctors.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2013.07.005A4Pain psychology specialist training 2012–2014P. Soini 1 , A. Valjakka 2 , S. Tuurinkoski 3 , M.Elomaa 4 ,T. Väänänen 5 , V. Hägg 61Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, FinlandRaisio Substance Abuse and Mental Health Unit,Raisio, Finland3 The Hospital District of South Ostrobothnia,Seinäjoki, Finland4 Helsinki University Central Hospital Pain Clinic,Helsinki, Finland5 Tuusula Health Care Center, Occupational HealthCare, Tuusula, Finland6 Private Psychotherapy Practice, Espoo, Finland2Aims: The training includes learning the practical skills relatedto the psychological examination, treatment and rehabilitation ofpain patients. The completion of the training prepares for workin multiprofessional teams as a specialist in pain psychology. Ajoint project of the Finnish Association of the Study of Pain andthe Psychology Institute since 2008.Participants: Psychologists working in public, private or occupational health care, in rehabilitation or psychiatric clinics. Thefourth training group of 20 psychologists started in the spring of2012. More than 40 psychologists have already been trained in1998–2010.The structure and content of the training:Seminars: Eight seminars include 12 days of training on thetopics of pain as a psychosocial phenomenon, psychological assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of pain patients, interaction andmultiprofessional teamwork.Tutorial groups: Eight tutorial meetings of 5 students and onetutor in each group gather together in different parts of Finlandto discuss selected scientific articles, work on their professionalidentity as pain psychologists and receive supervision of clinicaland diploma work.Literature: Getting acquainted with scientific research reportson pain psychology and with vocational literature.Diploma work: Written article or a short research report on adevelopment project, experiment or a phenomenon related to painpsychology.Optional studies: Giving a lecture or training on the topic ofpain psychology to other professionals or patients, participating ina pain education organized by others, writing a report on a research,treatment or rehabilitation experiment or a book review to be published.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2013.07.006A5Pain assessment, documentation, andmanagement in a university hospitalS. Zoëga 1,2 , T. Aspelund 2 , G. Sigurdsson 1,2 , S.E.Ward 3 ,H. Sveinsdóttir 1,2 , S. Gunnarsdóttir 1,21 Landspítali – The National University Hospital ofIceland, Reykjavík, Iceland2 University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland3 University of Wisconsin, Madison, USAAims: To determine if pain is assessed, documented, and treatedin a university hospital according to recommended practice.Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study, conducted in 23medical and surgical wards in a university hospital. Participantswere patients hospitalized for at least 24 hours, ≥18 years of age,and able to participate. Data were collected from patients with aquestionnaire (APS-POQ-R), from their medical records, and fromTherapy® , the hospital medication system.Results: The response rate was 73%. Participants (N = 308) meanage was 67.5 years (SD = 17.4), 50.5% were women. Pain prevalence in the past 24 h was 83.1% and severe pain was experiencedby 34.5%. Descriptions of pain were documented for 60.7%. Standardized methods of assessment were used in 11.6% of patients,other forms of documentation included descriptions as “no paincomplaints”, and “patient received 2 Panodil”. The majority ofpatients (66.8%) were prescribed pain medications and 34.0% ofpatients used non-pharmacological methods to treat their pain. Thepain management index (PMI = prescribed pain medication – worstpain severity) was negative for 38.6% indicating insufficient treatment. The PMI was more favorable in surgical compared to medicalpatients, 2 (6, N = 306) = 17.81, p = 0.007.Conclusions: Pain was both prevalent and severe. Althoughsome form of documentation of pain was recorded for the majorityof patients, pain was rarely assessed with standardized methods.Many patients did not receive adequate treatment. There is a need

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Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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