Optimists fare better when chronic pain strikes – Or does pain related disability make us pessimists?

Optimists fare better when chronic pain strikes – Or does pain related disability make us... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain (SJP) Whibley and colleagues report on how the relationship between neck and distal upper limb pain and disability is moderated by pain beliefs [1].1Persistent pain is the dominating cause of work disabilityPersistent pain is severely disabling. The SJP has previously published data from two independent studies showing that around 50% of the work disability is attributable to persistent pain [2, 3]. The costs for society are immense, making this a public health issue of utmost importance.2Individual specific factors contribute to wide variation in pain from the same disease or injuryPrevention and treatment of persistent pain has traditionally focused on diagnosing and treating the peripheral pathology causing pain. Thus if the patient suffers from pain from osteoarthritis of the hip, hip arthroplasty may be indicated. Unfortunately this approach fails in very many cases. This is firstly, because there appears to be poor correlation between the degree of peripheral pathology and the degree of pain, and secondly, because the peripheral pathology is frequently not known [4]. Though these findings may in part be explained by inadequate diagnostic techniques, for instance that we lack imaging techniques for detecting pathology in soft tissues, there http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Optimists fare better when chronic pain strikes – Or does pain related disability make us pessimists?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/degruyter/optimists-fare-better-when-chronic-pain-strikes-or-does-pain-related-a0pjASb37r
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.09.009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain (SJP) Whibley and colleagues report on how the relationship between neck and distal upper limb pain and disability is moderated by pain beliefs [1].1Persistent pain is the dominating cause of work disabilityPersistent pain is severely disabling. The SJP has previously published data from two independent studies showing that around 50% of the work disability is attributable to persistent pain [2, 3]. The costs for society are immense, making this a public health issue of utmost importance.2Individual specific factors contribute to wide variation in pain from the same disease or injuryPrevention and treatment of persistent pain has traditionally focused on diagnosing and treating the peripheral pathology causing pain. Thus if the patient suffers from pain from osteoarthritis of the hip, hip arthroplasty may be indicated. Unfortunately this approach fails in very many cases. This is firstly, because there appears to be poor correlation between the degree of peripheral pathology and the degree of pain, and secondly, because the peripheral pathology is frequently not known [4]. Though these findings may in part be explained by inadequate diagnostic techniques, for instance that we lack imaging techniques for detecting pathology in soft tissues, there

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2016

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off