Obesity has an impact on outcome in lumbar disc surgery

Obesity has an impact on outcome in lumbar disc surgery ABSTRACTPurposeTo investigate the effect of obesity on outcome in lumbar discectomy.MethodsA cross-sectional postal survey; a self-made questionnaire, Beck depression inventory IA (BDI IA) and the Oswestry low back disability questionnaire (ODI) were sent to the patients, who had undergone lumbar disc surgery in the Oulu University Hospital between June 2005 and May 2008. Patients were divided into three groups according to BMI: normal, pre-obese and obese. The ODI was also examined in the framework of the international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) to investigate its ability to describe various dimensions of functioning (body structure and functions, activities and participation).ResultsThe postal survey was sent to 642 patients, of whom 355 (55%) replied. Males dominated in the pre-obese (66%) and obese (62%) groups (p = 0.01). Normal-weighted and pre-obese patients had lower BDI scores compared to obese patients (mean BDI: 8.0, 7.6,11.2, respectively, p = 0.035). Total ODI score was highest in the obese group compared to normal-weighted or pre-obese (20.3,18.6,26.4, respectively, p = 0.011). When ODI was linked to the ICF there were significant differences in all activity domains (mobility, self-care and interpersonal interactions and relationships) and the mobility component of the participation domain between the weight groups.Conclusions and implicationsObesity has an impact on outcome in lumbar discectomy. Obese patients had higher scores in BDI and ODI indicating mild mood disturbances and moderate functional disability. According to ICF, functional disability of obese patients was observed to some extent in all activity domains. Obese patients will be more frequently present for disc surgery and increased morbidity risk must be recognized. We need a strategy to rehabilitate and activate obese patients pre- and postoperatively. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Obesity has an impact on outcome in lumbar disc surgery

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2015 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.10.003
Publisher site
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Abstract

ABSTRACTPurposeTo investigate the effect of obesity on outcome in lumbar discectomy.MethodsA cross-sectional postal survey; a self-made questionnaire, Beck depression inventory IA (BDI IA) and the Oswestry low back disability questionnaire (ODI) were sent to the patients, who had undergone lumbar disc surgery in the Oulu University Hospital between June 2005 and May 2008. Patients were divided into three groups according to BMI: normal, pre-obese and obese. The ODI was also examined in the framework of the international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) to investigate its ability to describe various dimensions of functioning (body structure and functions, activities and participation).ResultsThe postal survey was sent to 642 patients, of whom 355 (55%) replied. Males dominated in the pre-obese (66%) and obese (62%) groups (p = 0.01). Normal-weighted and pre-obese patients had lower BDI scores compared to obese patients (mean BDI: 8.0, 7.6,11.2, respectively, p = 0.035). Total ODI score was highest in the obese group compared to normal-weighted or pre-obese (20.3,18.6,26.4, respectively, p = 0.011). When ODI was linked to the ICF there were significant differences in all activity domains (mobility, self-care and interpersonal interactions and relationships) and the mobility component of the participation domain between the weight groups.Conclusions and implicationsObesity has an impact on outcome in lumbar discectomy. Obese patients had higher scores in BDI and ODI indicating mild mood disturbances and moderate functional disability. According to ICF, functional disability of obese patients was observed to some extent in all activity domains. Obese patients will be more frequently present for disc surgery and increased morbidity risk must be recognized. We need a strategy to rehabilitate and activate obese patients pre- and postoperatively.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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