Neuraxial blocks and spinal haematoma: Review of 166 cases published 1994 – 2015. Part 2: diagnosis, treatment, and outcome

Neuraxial blocks and spinal haematoma: Review of 166 cases published 1994 – 2015. Part 2:... AbstractBackground Bleeding into the vertebral canal causing a spinal haematoma (SH) is a rare but serious complication to central neuraxial blocks (CNB). Of all serious complications to CNBs, neurological injury associated with SH has the worst prognosis. Around the turn of the millennium, the first guidelines aiming to reduce the risk of this complication were published. These guidelines are based on known risk factors for SH, rather than evidence from randomized, controlled trials (RCTs). RCTs, and hence meta-analysis of RCTs, are not appropriate for identifying rare events. Analysing data from a significant number of published case reports of rare complications may reveal risk factors and patterns undetectable in reports on occasional cases, and can thereby help to improve management of CNBs. The aims of the present review were to analyse case reports of SH after CNBs published between 1994 and 2015 with regard to diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of SH after CNB.Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE were utilized to find case reports published in English, German, or Scandinavian languages between 1994 and end of 2015, using appropriate search terms. Reference lists were also scrutinized for case reports. We documented initial and worst symptoms and signs of SH, diagnostic methods, treatment, and outcome of the SH. We calculated occurrences in per cent using the number of informative reports as denominator.Results One hundred and sixty-six case reports on spinal hematomas after CNB published during the years between 1994 and 2015 were identified. Eighty per cent of the patients had severe neurological symptoms (paresis or paralysis). When compared over time, outcomes have improved significantly. Among patients subjected to surgical evacuation of the hematoma, outcomes were best if surgery was performed within 12 hours from the firstsign of motor dysfunction. However, even patients operated after more than 24 hours had relatively favourable outcomes. Whereas the outcomes after surgical evacuation of the epidural haematomas were quite satisfactory, only one of the operations for subdural haematoma (SSDH) resulted in a favourable outcome.Conclusions and implicationsSuspicion of a spinal hematoma calls for the consultation of an orthopaedic or neurological surgeon without delay. MRI is the recommended diagnostic tool. Surgical evacuation within 12 h from the first sign of motor dysfunction seems to lead to the best outcome, although many patients operated as late as after more than 24 hours did regain full motor function. Despite the poor prognosis after surgical evacuation of SSDH, the outcomes after post-CNB spinal haematoma in general have improved significantly over time. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Neuraxial blocks and spinal haematoma: Review of 166 cases published 1994 – 2015. Part 2: diagnosis, treatment, and outcome

Loading next page...
 
/lp/degruyter/neuraxial-blocks-and-spinal-haematoma-review-of-166-cases-published-HbQN6pdnql
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.11.009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackground Bleeding into the vertebral canal causing a spinal haematoma (SH) is a rare but serious complication to central neuraxial blocks (CNB). Of all serious complications to CNBs, neurological injury associated with SH has the worst prognosis. Around the turn of the millennium, the first guidelines aiming to reduce the risk of this complication were published. These guidelines are based on known risk factors for SH, rather than evidence from randomized, controlled trials (RCTs). RCTs, and hence meta-analysis of RCTs, are not appropriate for identifying rare events. Analysing data from a significant number of published case reports of rare complications may reveal risk factors and patterns undetectable in reports on occasional cases, and can thereby help to improve management of CNBs. The aims of the present review were to analyse case reports of SH after CNBs published between 1994 and 2015 with regard to diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of SH after CNB.Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE were utilized to find case reports published in English, German, or Scandinavian languages between 1994 and end of 2015, using appropriate search terms. Reference lists were also scrutinized for case reports. We documented initial and worst symptoms and signs of SH, diagnostic methods, treatment, and outcome of the SH. We calculated occurrences in per cent using the number of informative reports as denominator.Results One hundred and sixty-six case reports on spinal hematomas after CNB published during the years between 1994 and 2015 were identified. Eighty per cent of the patients had severe neurological symptoms (paresis or paralysis). When compared over time, outcomes have improved significantly. Among patients subjected to surgical evacuation of the hematoma, outcomes were best if surgery was performed within 12 hours from the firstsign of motor dysfunction. However, even patients operated after more than 24 hours had relatively favourable outcomes. Whereas the outcomes after surgical evacuation of the epidural haematomas were quite satisfactory, only one of the operations for subdural haematoma (SSDH) resulted in a favourable outcome.Conclusions and implicationsSuspicion of a spinal hematoma calls for the consultation of an orthopaedic or neurological surgeon without delay. MRI is the recommended diagnostic tool. Surgical evacuation within 12 h from the first sign of motor dysfunction seems to lead to the best outcome, although many patients operated as late as after more than 24 hours did regain full motor function. Despite the poor prognosis after surgical evacuation of SSDH, the outcomes after post-CNB spinal haematoma in general have improved significantly over time.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Apr 1, 2017

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off