More than half of patients in a large fibromyalgia study have a depressive trait style and report more severe symptom profiles

More than half of patients in a large fibromyalgia study have a depressive trait style and report... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Toussaint and coworkers [1] report on the relationship between different affective trait styles and severity of fibromyalgia symptoms. Understanding the interaction between pain pathophysiology and dispositional affect has long been the holy grail of clinical pain research, especially since effective treatment for long-term pain is limited and the psychiatric comorbidity is high. In addition to enhanced management of chronic pain, increased knowledge about pain and affective trait styles could potentially lead to prevention of disease, as negative mood may not only be the consequence of long-term pain, but also a catalyst in the vicious circle that transforms acute pain into long-term pain and disability [2].1Fibromyalgia is a common pain disorderFibromyalgia is a common pain disorder, affecting 2–4% of the populations of industrialized countries [3]. Recent data suggests that fibromyalgia symptoms are caused by a generalized disturbance in central nervous system pain processing, leading to pain throughout the body in the absence of any tissue damage [4,5]. As for many pain syndromes, treatment options for fibromyalgia are scarce, and long-term follow-ups suggest small chances of recovery [6].2Depression and chronic pain manifest together but may represent segregated mechanisms. Forget the “chicken or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

More than half of patients in a large fibromyalgia study have a depressive trait style and report more severe symptom profiles

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2014 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2014.05.009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Toussaint and coworkers [1] report on the relationship between different affective trait styles and severity of fibromyalgia symptoms. Understanding the interaction between pain pathophysiology and dispositional affect has long been the holy grail of clinical pain research, especially since effective treatment for long-term pain is limited and the psychiatric comorbidity is high. In addition to enhanced management of chronic pain, increased knowledge about pain and affective trait styles could potentially lead to prevention of disease, as negative mood may not only be the consequence of long-term pain, but also a catalyst in the vicious circle that transforms acute pain into long-term pain and disability [2].1Fibromyalgia is a common pain disorderFibromyalgia is a common pain disorder, affecting 2–4% of the populations of industrialized countries [3]. Recent data suggests that fibromyalgia symptoms are caused by a generalized disturbance in central nervous system pain processing, leading to pain throughout the body in the absence of any tissue damage [4,5]. As for many pain syndromes, treatment options for fibromyalgia are scarce, and long-term follow-ups suggest small chances of recovery [6].2Depression and chronic pain manifest together but may represent segregated mechanisms. Forget the “chicken or

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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