It’s not cool to reduce the skin temperature and activate the TRPM8 ion channel after spinal injury

It’s not cool to reduce the skin temperature and activate the TRPM8 ion channel after spinal... Sensory signals eliciting perceptions of pain, warmth and cool are mediated by thin myelinated or unmyelinated primary afferent nerve fibers. In the skin, these nerve fibers appear in light microscopy as free nerve endings. To be able to detect and discriminate sensory stimuli, the cell membrane of the free nerve endings expresses various types of receptors that are specialized for transducing mechanical, thermal and/or chemical stimuli into electrical signals. The transduction of external stimuli to action potentials is required for eliciting sensations resulting from peripheral stimulation, since the sensory signal to the brain is carried by action potentials in the primary afferent nerve fibers. Among the receptors contributing to the transduction process on free nerve endings are those belonging to the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels [1]. TRP channels, when activated by sensory stimuli, allow inflow of cations (Na+ and Ca2+) and thereby they cause depolarization that may induce action potentials. Of the TRP family members expressed on nociceptive primary afferent nerve fibers, the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) are so far the best-known ion channel receptors involved in the transduction of potential tissue-damaging stimuli. TRPV1 is activated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

It’s not cool to reduce the skin temperature and activate the TRPM8 ion channel after spinal injury

Loading next page...
 
/lp/degruyter/it-s-not-cool-to-reduce-the-skin-temperature-and-activate-the-trpm8-bjDM28VW9I
Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2012 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2012.11.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Sensory signals eliciting perceptions of pain, warmth and cool are mediated by thin myelinated or unmyelinated primary afferent nerve fibers. In the skin, these nerve fibers appear in light microscopy as free nerve endings. To be able to detect and discriminate sensory stimuli, the cell membrane of the free nerve endings expresses various types of receptors that are specialized for transducing mechanical, thermal and/or chemical stimuli into electrical signals. The transduction of external stimuli to action potentials is required for eliciting sensations resulting from peripheral stimulation, since the sensory signal to the brain is carried by action potentials in the primary afferent nerve fibers. Among the receptors contributing to the transduction process on free nerve endings are those belonging to the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels [1]. TRP channels, when activated by sensory stimuli, allow inflow of cations (Na+ and Ca2+) and thereby they cause depolarization that may induce action potentials. Of the TRP family members expressed on nociceptive primary afferent nerve fibers, the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) are so far the best-known ion channel receptors involved in the transduction of potential tissue-damaging stimuli. TRPV1 is activated

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial