Is there a place for pulsed radiofrequency in the treatment of chronic pain?

Is there a place for pulsed radiofrequency in the treatment of chronic pain? In the present issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Lindquist and Backryd report on the short-term effect of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment in chronic non-cancer pain conditions at a tertiary pain centre in Sweden [1]. Most of the patients received PRF because of clinically suspected lumbar facet joint related pain. In smaller groups of patients dorsal root ganglia or peripheral nerves were treated.1radiofrequency treatment for chronic painContinuous radiofrequency (CRF) ablation was first described in 1931, after a patient with trigeminal neuralgia had been treated with thermocoagulation of the gasserian ganglion, but radiofrequency (RF) generators did not become commercially available until the late 1950s [2]. Today, facet joint procedures, including PRF or CRF, are among the most frequently performed interventions to relieve pain. The Australian professor Nikolai Bogduk and his co-workers have performed numerous studies within this area to describe the relevant anatomy, patterns of facet joint related pain, and the effect of RF neurotomy [3,4,5]. However, the clinical evidence of RF treatment for chronic pain conditions is still limited.2Predictive nerve blocksReversible medial branch blocks have been considered to be the best method to identify facet joint related pain. According to Bogduk et al. the nerve blocks should be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Is there a place for pulsed radiofrequency in the treatment of chronic pain?

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.04.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the present issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Lindquist and Backryd report on the short-term effect of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment in chronic non-cancer pain conditions at a tertiary pain centre in Sweden [1]. Most of the patients received PRF because of clinically suspected lumbar facet joint related pain. In smaller groups of patients dorsal root ganglia or peripheral nerves were treated.1radiofrequency treatment for chronic painContinuous radiofrequency (CRF) ablation was first described in 1931, after a patient with trigeminal neuralgia had been treated with thermocoagulation of the gasserian ganglion, but radiofrequency (RF) generators did not become commercially available until the late 1950s [2]. Today, facet joint procedures, including PRF or CRF, are among the most frequently performed interventions to relieve pain. The Australian professor Nikolai Bogduk and his co-workers have performed numerous studies within this area to describe the relevant anatomy, patterns of facet joint related pain, and the effect of RF neurotomy [3,4,5]. However, the clinical evidence of RF treatment for chronic pain conditions is still limited.2Predictive nerve blocksReversible medial branch blocks have been considered to be the best method to identify facet joint related pain. According to Bogduk et al. the nerve blocks should be

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Jul 1, 2016

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