Is the search for a “pain personality” of added value to the Fear-Avoidance-Model (FAM) of chronic pain?

Is the search for a “pain personality” of added value to the Fear-Avoidance-Model (FAM) of... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Brooke Naylor, Simon Boag and Sylvia Maria Gustin present a thought provoking narrative review of 120 years of research on the relationship between chronic pain and personality [1]. The study of personality is a branch within psychology that aims to identify traits and mechanisms within individuals that are organized and relatively enduring and that influence interactions with, and adaptations to, the environment (including the intrapsychic, physical, and social environment) [2]. Needless to say, chronic pain and its associated suffering has sparked a longstanding and varied research effort to try and capture individual characteristics and mechanisms relevant to understanding the occurrence and maintenance of pain problems. Throughout the 20th century this effort has taken many shapes and forms, historically mostly following the flow of research with the field of personality research at large. In their account of this research, Naylor et al. touch upon for example early psychodynamic formulations, MMPI profiling studies, trait studies focused on neuroticism, anxiety sensitivity and injury/illness sensitivity, and attachment studies. However, these accounts provide a backdrop of the review, as the focus and aim is on presenting and making a case for the potential added value http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Is the search for a “pain personality” of added value to the Fear-Avoidance-Model (FAM) of chronic pain?

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.08.019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Brooke Naylor, Simon Boag and Sylvia Maria Gustin present a thought provoking narrative review of 120 years of research on the relationship between chronic pain and personality [1]. The study of personality is a branch within psychology that aims to identify traits and mechanisms within individuals that are organized and relatively enduring and that influence interactions with, and adaptations to, the environment (including the intrapsychic, physical, and social environment) [2]. Needless to say, chronic pain and its associated suffering has sparked a longstanding and varied research effort to try and capture individual characteristics and mechanisms relevant to understanding the occurrence and maintenance of pain problems. Throughout the 20th century this effort has taken many shapes and forms, historically mostly following the flow of research with the field of personality research at large. In their account of this research, Naylor et al. touch upon for example early psychodynamic formulations, MMPI profiling studies, trait studies focused on neuroticism, anxiety sensitivity and injury/illness sensitivity, and attachment studies. However, these accounts provide a backdrop of the review, as the focus and aim is on presenting and making a case for the potential added value

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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