Is musculoskeletal pain associated with work engagement?

Is musculoskeletal pain associated with work engagement? In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Kirsi Malmberg-Ceder and co-workers from Helsinki, Turku, Kuopio, and Pori in Finland publish their cross-sectional study on possible factors associated with lower work-engagement, such as burden of pain and several psychosocial issues [1].An apparent statistically highly significant association between medium and severe burden of pain and work-engagement became less impressive after multivariate ordered logistic regression analyses. Still, duration of sick-leave due to musculoskeletal pain did lower work-engagement significantly. They concluded that psychosocial and life-style factors significantly correlated with work-engagement. Uncomplicated pain per se did not have this effect [1].1How disabling a pain condition becomes is determined by many add-on factors, in addition to the pain per seWork, health, and work ability should be discussed within a bio-psycho-social framework since biological/medical, psychological, and social factors contribute to health and function. Retirement due to disability is a result of a series of processes. Medical condition, physiological and psychological function, competence, job characteristics, individual appraisal of work ability, physician’s assessment of work ability, job motivation, availability of alternative work tasks, legislation, economical incentives, macroeconomic conditions, may contribute in the processes leading from good health and high work ability to disability and exit from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Is musculoskeletal pain associated with work engagement?

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.12.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Kirsi Malmberg-Ceder and co-workers from Helsinki, Turku, Kuopio, and Pori in Finland publish their cross-sectional study on possible factors associated with lower work-engagement, such as burden of pain and several psychosocial issues [1].An apparent statistically highly significant association between medium and severe burden of pain and work-engagement became less impressive after multivariate ordered logistic regression analyses. Still, duration of sick-leave due to musculoskeletal pain did lower work-engagement significantly. They concluded that psychosocial and life-style factors significantly correlated with work-engagement. Uncomplicated pain per se did not have this effect [1].1How disabling a pain condition becomes is determined by many add-on factors, in addition to the pain per seWork, health, and work ability should be discussed within a bio-psycho-social framework since biological/medical, psychological, and social factors contribute to health and function. Retirement due to disability is a result of a series of processes. Medical condition, physiological and psychological function, competence, job characteristics, individual appraisal of work ability, physician’s assessment of work ability, job motivation, availability of alternative work tasks, legislation, economical incentives, macroeconomic conditions, may contribute in the processes leading from good health and high work ability to disability and exit from

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Apr 1, 2017

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