Intravenous non-opioids for immediate postop pain relief in day-case programmes: Paracetamol (acetaminophen) and ketorolac are good choices reducing opioid needs and opioid side-effects

Intravenous non-opioids for immediate postop pain relief in day-case programmes: Paracetamol... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Anand et al. report on their study comparing intravenous 1 g of paracetamol (acetaminophen) (Perfalgan® in the Nordic countries Ofirmev® in the USA) with intravenous 30 mg ketorolac (Toradol®) given during the procedure in order to reduce pain in the immediate post-anaesthesia/post-operative period [1]. They found no difference in the first half-hour, but after 45 min the pain intensity was somewhat less in the ketorolac treated patients who had an ambulatory parathyroidectomy. Opioid use for rescue analgesia was not different, but there was a bit more nausea in the paracetamol-treated patients [1].1Is this interesting enough to warrant publication?The procedure is a minor one, but as stated recently by Joshi and Kehlet in an editorial in Anaesthesiology the pain experienced after different types of surgical procedures is often not related to our preconceptions of the degree of tissue damage and need for post-operative pain relief [2]. The study by Anand et al. had an adequate number of patients in each group (total 180) so that this procedure, parathyroidectomy with or without thyroid nodule removal, can now confidentially be added to the long list of surgical procedures (n = 179 procedures in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Intravenous non-opioids for immediate postop pain relief in day-case programmes: Paracetamol (acetaminophen) and ketorolac are good choices reducing opioid needs and opioid side-effects

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2013 Scandiavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2013.07.018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain Anand et al. report on their study comparing intravenous 1 g of paracetamol (acetaminophen) (Perfalgan® in the Nordic countries Ofirmev® in the USA) with intravenous 30 mg ketorolac (Toradol®) given during the procedure in order to reduce pain in the immediate post-anaesthesia/post-operative period [1]. They found no difference in the first half-hour, but after 45 min the pain intensity was somewhat less in the ketorolac treated patients who had an ambulatory parathyroidectomy. Opioid use for rescue analgesia was not different, but there was a bit more nausea in the paracetamol-treated patients [1].1Is this interesting enough to warrant publication?The procedure is a minor one, but as stated recently by Joshi and Kehlet in an editorial in Anaesthesiology the pain experienced after different types of surgical procedures is often not related to our preconceptions of the degree of tissue damage and need for post-operative pain relief [2]. The study by Anand et al. had an adequate number of patients in each group (total 180) so that this procedure, parathyroidectomy with or without thyroid nodule removal, can now confidentially be added to the long list of surgical procedures (n = 179 procedures in

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Oct 1, 2013

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