Infrared analysis of lipoproteins in the detection of alcohol biomarkers

Infrared analysis of lipoproteins in the detection of alcohol biomarkers AbstractBackground:Alcoholism is a major public health problem. Alcohol causes modifications in the composition and concentration of lipoproteins and influences the enzymes and transfer proteins that transform lipoproteins in plasma. Alcohol is associated with the presence of alcohol biomarkers (fatty acid ethyl esters [FAEEs] and phosphatidylethanol [PEth]) in lipoproteins. We explore the possibilities of detecting alcohol biomarkers in non-high-density-lipoproteins (non-HDLs) precipitated from serum using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR).Methods:Analyzes were carried out on stored serum samples, with known % carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) values, included in a driver’s license regranting program under the control of the Belgian Institute of Road Safety. The study consisted of 127 control samples (CDT≤1.3%) and 114 alcoholic samples (CDT>1.3%). Liver enzymes, CRP, triglycerides, total, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol values were determined. Non-HDLs were precipitated with sodium phosphotungstate and MgCl2 and analyzed using ATR-FTIR in the range from 4500 cm−1 to 450 cm−1 using a Perkin Elmer ATR-FTIR Spectrometer Two.Results:The area under the curve of the 1130–990 cm−1 region (AUC1130−990 cm−1) was able to discriminate controls from alcoholics (p<0.0001) due to the presence of FAEEs in lipoproteins. Multiple regression analysis significantly predicted the AUC1130−990 cm−1 (adj. r2=0.13, p<0.0001). Significant correlations were found between AUC1130−990 cm−1 and CDT values (r=0.32, p<0.0001), AST/ALT ratio (r=0.21, p=0.001). GGT showed no significant correlation.Conclusions:Infrared analysis of lipoproteins is a potential tool in the detection of alcohol biomarkers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) de Gruyter

Infrared analysis of lipoproteins in the detection of alcohol biomarkers

Loading next page...
 
/lp/degruyter/infrared-analysis-of-lipoproteins-in-the-detection-of-alcohol-UOxHHkAfA7
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
©2017 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
1437-4331
eISSN
1437-4331
D.O.I.
10.1515/cclm-2016-0668
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackground:Alcoholism is a major public health problem. Alcohol causes modifications in the composition and concentration of lipoproteins and influences the enzymes and transfer proteins that transform lipoproteins in plasma. Alcohol is associated with the presence of alcohol biomarkers (fatty acid ethyl esters [FAEEs] and phosphatidylethanol [PEth]) in lipoproteins. We explore the possibilities of detecting alcohol biomarkers in non-high-density-lipoproteins (non-HDLs) precipitated from serum using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR).Methods:Analyzes were carried out on stored serum samples, with known % carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) values, included in a driver’s license regranting program under the control of the Belgian Institute of Road Safety. The study consisted of 127 control samples (CDT≤1.3%) and 114 alcoholic samples (CDT>1.3%). Liver enzymes, CRP, triglycerides, total, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol values were determined. Non-HDLs were precipitated with sodium phosphotungstate and MgCl2 and analyzed using ATR-FTIR in the range from 4500 cm−1 to 450 cm−1 using a Perkin Elmer ATR-FTIR Spectrometer Two.Results:The area under the curve of the 1130–990 cm−1 region (AUC1130−990 cm−1) was able to discriminate controls from alcoholics (p<0.0001) due to the presence of FAEEs in lipoproteins. Multiple regression analysis significantly predicted the AUC1130−990 cm−1 (adj. r2=0.13, p<0.0001). Significant correlations were found between AUC1130−990 cm−1 and CDT values (r=0.32, p<0.0001), AST/ALT ratio (r=0.21, p=0.001). GGT showed no significant correlation.Conclusions:Infrared analysis of lipoproteins is a potential tool in the detection of alcohol biomarkers.

Journal

Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)de Gruyter

Published: Jun 1, 2017

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off