Information overload: when less is more in medical imaging

Information overload: when less is more in medical imaging AbstractIn medicine, data collection and analysis provide the information needed to reduce diagnostic uncertainty. An examination of how medical imaging data is collected and then transformed into diagnostic information provides testable ideas for better managing this dynamic process. In other fields, process data is systematically assessed for differences between observed and predicted values. For studies that expose patients to the potentially harmful effects of ionizing radiation, monitoring imaging studies/illness, images/imaging study and radiation exposure/image would be steps towards developing radiation dose budgets for the diagnosis and treatment of common conditions. Random variation within the expected range would signal a high quality process. Conversely, single outlying cases or nonrandom variation within the expected range would trigger an investigation for a possible underlying cause. Such investigations would provide insights into how to continually improve this important aspect of healthcare. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Diagnosis de Gruyter

Information overload: when less is more in medical imaging

Diagnosis , Volume 4 (3): 5 – Sep 26, 2017

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
©2017 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
2194-802X
eISSN
2194-802X
D.O.I.
10.1515/dx-2017-0008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractIn medicine, data collection and analysis provide the information needed to reduce diagnostic uncertainty. An examination of how medical imaging data is collected and then transformed into diagnostic information provides testable ideas for better managing this dynamic process. In other fields, process data is systematically assessed for differences between observed and predicted values. For studies that expose patients to the potentially harmful effects of ionizing radiation, monitoring imaging studies/illness, images/imaging study and radiation exposure/image would be steps towards developing radiation dose budgets for the diagnosis and treatment of common conditions. Random variation within the expected range would signal a high quality process. Conversely, single outlying cases or nonrandom variation within the expected range would trigger an investigation for a possible underlying cause. Such investigations would provide insights into how to continually improve this important aspect of healthcare.

Journal

Diagnosisde Gruyter

Published: Sep 26, 2017

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