Inflammation, fever, and body temperature under febrile conditions

Inflammation, fever, and body temperature under febrile conditions Fever is a cardinal symptom in critically ill patients. It develops in response to various infectious or non-infectious stimuli. A febrile response is just one component of a complex array of host defense responses, collectively termed as acute phase response (APR), which occurs during the time-course of the systemic inflammation. The APR is a pronounced systemic reaction to disturbances of homeostasis, which is caused by infections, tissue injury, neoplastic growth, or immunological disorders; fever is one of the most prominent components of the APR, a hallmark of disease [1, 2]. During systemic inflammation, phases of fever and phases of hypothermia can alternate, depending on the severity of a given inflammatory insult or on environmental conditions [3, 4]. It is a matter of debate, whether the strength of the fever or the degree of hypothermia is of prognostic value for the final outcome (i.e. survival) in critically ill patients [5].According to the classical view, fever develops in several steps starting with the appearance of a given pathogenic agent, the “exogenous pyrogen”, in the afflicted host. This exogenous pyrogen, in turn, causes the release of fever-producing substances by the host’s polymorphonuclear leukocytes and by other cells. These substances are, therefore, called http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology de Gruyter

Inflammation, fever, and body temperature under febrile conditions

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
©2017 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
2191-0286
eISSN
2191-0286
D.O.I.
10.1515/jbcpp-2017-0175
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Fever is a cardinal symptom in critically ill patients. It develops in response to various infectious or non-infectious stimuli. A febrile response is just one component of a complex array of host defense responses, collectively termed as acute phase response (APR), which occurs during the time-course of the systemic inflammation. The APR is a pronounced systemic reaction to disturbances of homeostasis, which is caused by infections, tissue injury, neoplastic growth, or immunological disorders; fever is one of the most prominent components of the APR, a hallmark of disease [1, 2]. During systemic inflammation, phases of fever and phases of hypothermia can alternate, depending on the severity of a given inflammatory insult or on environmental conditions [3, 4]. It is a matter of debate, whether the strength of the fever or the degree of hypothermia is of prognostic value for the final outcome (i.e. survival) in critically ill patients [5].According to the classical view, fever develops in several steps starting with the appearance of a given pathogenic agent, the “exogenous pyrogen”, in the afflicted host. This exogenous pyrogen, in turn, causes the release of fever-producing substances by the host’s polymorphonuclear leukocytes and by other cells. These substances are, therefore, called

Journal

Journal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacologyde Gruyter

Published: Nov 27, 2017

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