Hyperalgesia after experimental and work-related sleep restriction

Hyperalgesia after experimental and work-related sleep restriction AbstractAimsSleep restriction (SR) increases pain sensitivity. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of night work on pain sensitivity with experimental SR.MethodsIn study I 22 healthy volunteers (14 females) and in study II 24 nurses (17 females) received pain stimuli in the laboratory twice; after 2 nights with habitual sleep (study I and II) and after 2 nights of experimental 50% SR (study I) or after 2 nights of work (study II). Order of sleep conditions was randomized. Heat pain at intensity 6/10 (pain-6), the pressure pain threshold (PPT), and subjective sleepiness with Karolinska sleepiness scale (KSS) were assessed. A linear mixed model (LMM) with random intercept and random slope was used. Difference scores were compared between study I and II by independent t-tests (PPT and pain-6) and the Mann–Whitney U test (KSS).ResultsBaseline subjective sleepiness (KSS), PPT or pain-6 ratings did not differ between study I and II (p > 0.47). KSS and heat pain ratings increased after both sleep conditions (p < 0.001), but did not differ between study I and II (p > 0.15). PPT was lower after experimental SR (p = 0.007), but unchanged after night work (p = 0.63), but did not differ between study I and II (p = 0.16).ConclusionsBoth experimental and night work-induced SR leads to comparable increased subjective sleepiness and higher pain ratings to heat pain stimuli. PPT was lower after experimental SR, but was not affected by night work-induced SR. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Hyperalgesia after experimental and work-related sleep restriction

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2015 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.04.018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractAimsSleep restriction (SR) increases pain sensitivity. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of night work on pain sensitivity with experimental SR.MethodsIn study I 22 healthy volunteers (14 females) and in study II 24 nurses (17 females) received pain stimuli in the laboratory twice; after 2 nights with habitual sleep (study I and II) and after 2 nights of experimental 50% SR (study I) or after 2 nights of work (study II). Order of sleep conditions was randomized. Heat pain at intensity 6/10 (pain-6), the pressure pain threshold (PPT), and subjective sleepiness with Karolinska sleepiness scale (KSS) were assessed. A linear mixed model (LMM) with random intercept and random slope was used. Difference scores were compared between study I and II by independent t-tests (PPT and pain-6) and the Mann–Whitney U test (KSS).ResultsBaseline subjective sleepiness (KSS), PPT or pain-6 ratings did not differ between study I and II (p > 0.47). KSS and heat pain ratings increased after both sleep conditions (p < 0.001), but did not differ between study I and II (p > 0.15). PPT was lower after experimental SR (p = 0.007), but unchanged after night work (p = 0.63), but did not differ between study I and II (p = 0.16).ConclusionsBoth experimental and night work-induced SR leads to comparable increased subjective sleepiness and higher pain ratings to heat pain stimuli. PPT was lower after experimental SR, but was not affected by night work-induced SR.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Jul 1, 2015

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