Higher D-lactate levels are associated with higher prevalence of small dense low-density lipoprotein in obese adolescents

Higher D-lactate levels are associated with higher prevalence of small dense low-density... AbstractBackground:Childhood obesity is associated with insulin resistance (IR), increased levels of small dense low-density lipoprotein (sd-LDL) as well as with augmented hepatic de novo lipogenesis, which implies increased triose phosphate fluxes that may lead to increased methylglyoxal (MG) and its catabolic end product D-lactate. We hypothesized that obese adolescents have increased D-lactate serum levels associated with high incidence of sd-LDL.Methods:This is a cross-sectional study where the anthropometric characteristics, atherogenic dyslipidemia complex, sd-LDL (Lipoprint, Quantimetrix) and D-lactate (kinetic enzymatic analysis) were explored in 30 lean vs. 30 obese adolescents (16 females and 14 males per group) without metabolic syndrome (MetS). Endothelial function by flow-mediated dilation (FMD, by ultrasound) and arterial lesion by carotid intima media thickness (CIMT, by ultrasound) were also measured.Results:The mean age of participants was 16.8 ± 1.4 years. Obese adolescents had a body mass index of 32.7 ± 3.8 vs. 21.8 ± 2.1 in lean participants. The obesity group showed higher D-lactate levels: 6.2 ± 3.0 vs. 4.5 ± 2.5 μmol/L, higher levels of insulin: 15 (9.6–23.5) vs. 7.9 (6.5–10.5) μIU/mL; triglyceride (TG): 1.46 (1.1–1.8) vs. 0.84 (0.6–1.2) mmol/L; non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (NON-HDL-C): 2.8 ± 0.9 vs. 2.3 ± 0.7 mmol/L; total cholesterol (TC)/HDL-C) index: 2.9 ± 0.7 vs. 2.4 ± 0.5; TG/HDL-C index: 2.2 (1.5–2.8) vs. 1.1 (0.8–1.8); %LDL-3: 4.2 ± 4.07 vs. 1.9 ± 2.7; smaller LDL size: 270.6 ± 3 vs. 272.2 ± 1.1 Å. D-lactate correlated positively with LDL-2: r = 0.44 and LDL-3 (sd-LDL): r = 0.49 and negatively with large LDL-1: r = −0.48 and LDL size: r = −0.46; (p<0.05, p<0.01, p<0.001 and p<0.0001, respectively). Obese adolescents showed higher CIMT: 0.51 ± 0.08 vs. 0.46 ± 0.08 mm and lower FMD: 20.3% ± 6.7% vs. 26.0% ± 9.3%.Conclusions:Obese adolescents display subclinical signs of IR and endothelial dysfunction. Higher serum sd-LDL levels correlated positively with D-lactate levels. These findings suggest an association between atherogenic dyslipoproteinemia and whole body MG fluxes already detectable in apparently healthy obese adolescents. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) de Gruyter

Higher D-lactate levels are associated with higher prevalence of small dense low-density lipoprotein in obese adolescents

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
©2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
1437-4331
eISSN
1437-4331
D.O.I.
10.1515/cclm-2017-0733
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackground:Childhood obesity is associated with insulin resistance (IR), increased levels of small dense low-density lipoprotein (sd-LDL) as well as with augmented hepatic de novo lipogenesis, which implies increased triose phosphate fluxes that may lead to increased methylglyoxal (MG) and its catabolic end product D-lactate. We hypothesized that obese adolescents have increased D-lactate serum levels associated with high incidence of sd-LDL.Methods:This is a cross-sectional study where the anthropometric characteristics, atherogenic dyslipidemia complex, sd-LDL (Lipoprint, Quantimetrix) and D-lactate (kinetic enzymatic analysis) were explored in 30 lean vs. 30 obese adolescents (16 females and 14 males per group) without metabolic syndrome (MetS). Endothelial function by flow-mediated dilation (FMD, by ultrasound) and arterial lesion by carotid intima media thickness (CIMT, by ultrasound) were also measured.Results:The mean age of participants was 16.8 ± 1.4 years. Obese adolescents had a body mass index of 32.7 ± 3.8 vs. 21.8 ± 2.1 in lean participants. The obesity group showed higher D-lactate levels: 6.2 ± 3.0 vs. 4.5 ± 2.5 μmol/L, higher levels of insulin: 15 (9.6–23.5) vs. 7.9 (6.5–10.5) μIU/mL; triglyceride (TG): 1.46 (1.1–1.8) vs. 0.84 (0.6–1.2) mmol/L; non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (NON-HDL-C): 2.8 ± 0.9 vs. 2.3 ± 0.7 mmol/L; total cholesterol (TC)/HDL-C) index: 2.9 ± 0.7 vs. 2.4 ± 0.5; TG/HDL-C index: 2.2 (1.5–2.8) vs. 1.1 (0.8–1.8); %LDL-3: 4.2 ± 4.07 vs. 1.9 ± 2.7; smaller LDL size: 270.6 ± 3 vs. 272.2 ± 1.1 Å. D-lactate correlated positively with LDL-2: r = 0.44 and LDL-3 (sd-LDL): r = 0.49 and negatively with large LDL-1: r = −0.48 and LDL size: r = −0.46; (p<0.05, p<0.01, p<0.001 and p<0.0001, respectively). Obese adolescents showed higher CIMT: 0.51 ± 0.08 vs. 0.46 ± 0.08 mm and lower FMD: 20.3% ± 6.7% vs. 26.0% ± 9.3%.Conclusions:Obese adolescents display subclinical signs of IR and endothelial dysfunction. Higher serum sd-LDL levels correlated positively with D-lactate levels. These findings suggest an association between atherogenic dyslipoproteinemia and whole body MG fluxes already detectable in apparently healthy obese adolescents.

Journal

Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)de Gruyter

Published: Jun 27, 2018

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