Healthcare resource use and costs of opioid-induced constipation among non-cancer and cancer patients on opioid therapy: A nationwide register-based cohort study in Denmark

Healthcare resource use and costs of opioid-induced constipation among non-cancer and cancer... AbstractBackground and aimOpioid analgesics are often effective for pain management, but may cause constipation. The aim of this study was to determine healthcare resource use and costs in non-cancer and cancer patients with opioid-induced constipation (OIC).MethodsThis was a nationwide register-based cohort study including patients ≥18years of age initiating ≥4 weeks opioid therapy (1998–2012) in Denmark. Ameasure of OIC was constructed based on data from Danish national health registries, and defined as ≥1 diagnosis of constipation, diverticulitis, mega colon, ileus/subileus, abdominal pain/acute abdomen or haemorrhoids and/or ≥2 subsequent prescription issues of laxatives. Total healthcare resource utilization and costs (including pharmacy dispense, inpatient-, outpatient-, emergency room- and primary care) were estimated according to OIC status, opioid treatment dosage and length, gender, age, marital status, and comorbidities using Generalised Linear Model.ResultsWe identified 97 169 eligible opioid users (77 568 non-cancer and 19 601 patients with a cancer diagnosis). Among non-cancer patients,15% were classified with OIC,10% had previous constipation, and 75% were without OIC. Patients characteristics of non-cancer OIC patients showed a higher frequency of strong opioid treatment (69% versus 41%), long-term opioid treatment (1189 days versus 584 days), advanced age (73 years versus 61 years), and cardiovascular disease (31%versus 19%) compared to those without OIC (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Non-cancer patients with OIC had 34% higher total healthcare costs compared to those without OIC (P < 0.001) after adjusting for age, gender, opioid usage, marital status and comorbidities. Among cancer patients, 35% were classified with OIC,14% had previous constipation, and 51% were without OIC. A higher proportion of cancer patients with OIC were continuous opioid users (85% versus 83%) and strong opioid users (97% versus 85%), compared to those without OIC (P <0.001 for both comparisons). Further, the mean number of days on opioids were higher for cancer patients with versus without OIC (329 days versus 238 days, P < 0.001). Total healthcare costs were 25% higher for cancer patients with versus without OIC (P < 0.001) after adjusting for age, gender, opioid usage, marital status and comorbidities. ConclusionsThe results of this nationwide study based on real life data suggested that both non-cancer patients and cancer patients suffering from opioid-induced constipation (OIC) may have higher healthcare resource utilization and higher associated costs compared to those without OIC.ImplicationsReducing the number of OIC patients has potential cost savings for the health care system. Special attention should be on patients at potential high risk of OIC, such as strong and long-term opioid treatment, advanced age, and concomitant cardiovascular disease. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Healthcare resource use and costs of opioid-induced constipation among non-cancer and cancer patients on opioid therapy: A nationwide register-based cohort study in Denmark

Loading next page...
 
/lp/degruyter/healthcare-resource-use-and-costs-of-opioid-induced-constipation-among-SUyVMaFLFK
Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.01.006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackground and aimOpioid analgesics are often effective for pain management, but may cause constipation. The aim of this study was to determine healthcare resource use and costs in non-cancer and cancer patients with opioid-induced constipation (OIC).MethodsThis was a nationwide register-based cohort study including patients ≥18years of age initiating ≥4 weeks opioid therapy (1998–2012) in Denmark. Ameasure of OIC was constructed based on data from Danish national health registries, and defined as ≥1 diagnosis of constipation, diverticulitis, mega colon, ileus/subileus, abdominal pain/acute abdomen or haemorrhoids and/or ≥2 subsequent prescription issues of laxatives. Total healthcare resource utilization and costs (including pharmacy dispense, inpatient-, outpatient-, emergency room- and primary care) were estimated according to OIC status, opioid treatment dosage and length, gender, age, marital status, and comorbidities using Generalised Linear Model.ResultsWe identified 97 169 eligible opioid users (77 568 non-cancer and 19 601 patients with a cancer diagnosis). Among non-cancer patients,15% were classified with OIC,10% had previous constipation, and 75% were without OIC. Patients characteristics of non-cancer OIC patients showed a higher frequency of strong opioid treatment (69% versus 41%), long-term opioid treatment (1189 days versus 584 days), advanced age (73 years versus 61 years), and cardiovascular disease (31%versus 19%) compared to those without OIC (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Non-cancer patients with OIC had 34% higher total healthcare costs compared to those without OIC (P < 0.001) after adjusting for age, gender, opioid usage, marital status and comorbidities. Among cancer patients, 35% were classified with OIC,14% had previous constipation, and 51% were without OIC. A higher proportion of cancer patients with OIC were continuous opioid users (85% versus 83%) and strong opioid users (97% versus 85%), compared to those without OIC (P <0.001 for both comparisons). Further, the mean number of days on opioids were higher for cancer patients with versus without OIC (329 days versus 238 days, P < 0.001). Total healthcare costs were 25% higher for cancer patients with versus without OIC (P < 0.001) after adjusting for age, gender, opioid usage, marital status and comorbidities. ConclusionsThe results of this nationwide study based on real life data suggested that both non-cancer patients and cancer patients suffering from opioid-induced constipation (OIC) may have higher healthcare resource utilization and higher associated costs compared to those without OIC.ImplicationsReducing the number of OIC patients has potential cost savings for the health care system. Special attention should be on patients at potential high risk of OIC, such as strong and long-term opioid treatment, advanced age, and concomitant cardiovascular disease.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off