GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 genetics and tetrahydrobiopterin—Modulators of pain hypersensitivity?

GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 genetics and tetrahydrobiopterin—Modulators of pain hypersensitivity? In this issue of Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Nasser and Birk Möller present a topical review on the role of the guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) genetics and the down-stream effects of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) in the pathophysiology of pain [1]. The review is based on the findings presented in Dr. Nasser’s recent PhD dissertation, titled “Involvement of the GCH1 gene and the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin in pain – a comparative study in mice and man” (University of Copenhagen 2013).1Why does acute pain become chronic in some patients?In patients undergoing the same surgical procedure, it has been shown that about 80% are pain free when followed up after some years, but around 20% still suffer from varying degrees of persistent pain, in some cases severe pain. Is this long term outcome concerning chronic pain due to a genetic disposition? Many research groups are at present investigating this question, and a multitude of candidate genes predisposing for vulnerability to chronic pain are suggested [2].2In search for a genetic explanation for pain vulnerability – the role of GCH1 and BH4The BH4 story in the pain field was kindled by an important publication by Tegeder et al. [3], showing that a certain GCH1 gene http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 genetics and tetrahydrobiopterin—Modulators of pain hypersensitivity?

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2014 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2014.02.001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Nasser and Birk Möller present a topical review on the role of the guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) genetics and the down-stream effects of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) in the pathophysiology of pain [1]. The review is based on the findings presented in Dr. Nasser’s recent PhD dissertation, titled “Involvement of the GCH1 gene and the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin in pain – a comparative study in mice and man” (University of Copenhagen 2013).1Why does acute pain become chronic in some patients?In patients undergoing the same surgical procedure, it has been shown that about 80% are pain free when followed up after some years, but around 20% still suffer from varying degrees of persistent pain, in some cases severe pain. Is this long term outcome concerning chronic pain due to a genetic disposition? Many research groups are at present investigating this question, and a multitude of candidate genes predisposing for vulnerability to chronic pain are suggested [2].2In search for a genetic explanation for pain vulnerability – the role of GCH1 and BH4The BH4 story in the pain field was kindled by an important publication by Tegeder et al. [3], showing that a certain GCH1 gene

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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