Fifty years on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain-intensity is still good for acute pain. But multidimensional assessment is needed for chronic pain

Fifty years on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain-intensity is still good for acute pain.... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain David Dorfman and his co-authors focus on limitations of changes in pain-intensity as outcome measure of management of patients with chronic pain [1].1Multidimensionality of chronic pain makes pain intensity inadequate as sole outcome metric of chronic pain managementThe Dorfman et al. paper is one of several recent publications questioning the usefulness of pain-intensity as an only measurement in chronic pain. Thus, Jane Ballantyne and Mark Sullivan late last year (2015) in the New England Journal of Medicine asked whether intensity of chronic pain is the wrong metric [2] and again this year (2016) in PAIN they state that it is not necessary to reduce pain-intensity in order to treat chronic pain well [3]. Fayers et al. [4] on behalf of the European Palliative Care Research Collaboration focus on the differences in reports of pain intensity and pain interference among chronic pain patients and palliative care patients in pain. In 2015 in the journal Quality of Life Research Cooket al. [5] call for establishing a common metric for self-reported pain by linking scales for pain interference with SF-36 bodily pain subscale.2VAS – the Visual Analogue Scale: after 50 years there is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Fifty years on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain-intensity is still good for acute pain. But multidimensional assessment is needed for chronic pain

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.02.004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain David Dorfman and his co-authors focus on limitations of changes in pain-intensity as outcome measure of management of patients with chronic pain [1].1Multidimensionality of chronic pain makes pain intensity inadequate as sole outcome metric of chronic pain managementThe Dorfman et al. paper is one of several recent publications questioning the usefulness of pain-intensity as an only measurement in chronic pain. Thus, Jane Ballantyne and Mark Sullivan late last year (2015) in the New England Journal of Medicine asked whether intensity of chronic pain is the wrong metric [2] and again this year (2016) in PAIN they state that it is not necessary to reduce pain-intensity in order to treat chronic pain well [3]. Fayers et al. [4] on behalf of the European Palliative Care Research Collaboration focus on the differences in reports of pain intensity and pain interference among chronic pain patients and palliative care patients in pain. In 2015 in the journal Quality of Life Research Cooket al. [5] call for establishing a common metric for self-reported pain by linking scales for pain interference with SF-36 bodily pain subscale.2VAS – the Visual Analogue Scale: after 50 years there is

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Apr 1, 2016

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