Exercising non-painful muscles can induce hypoalgesia in individuals with chronic pain

Exercising non-painful muscles can induce hypoalgesia in individuals with chronic pain 1What is exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH)?Almost 40 years ago, Black et al. [1] published the first article on the effect of physical exercise on pain sensitivity in humans illustrating that a period of running significantly reduced the pain sensitivity. This phenomenon also known as ‘exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH)’ is now well established in pain-free subjects, and it is typically demonstrated as reduced pain sensitivity in response to exercise [2]. Recently, the influence of different types of exercises [3] as well as the mechanisms underlying EIH [4] has been investigated. However, the effect of acute exercise on the pain sensitivity in subjects with different chronic pain conditions is still controversial, since both hypoalgesia, as well as no change in pain sensitivity, or even hyperalgesia (i.e. impaired EIH) has been reported following exercise.2Isometric exercise differs from aerobic exercise in effect on pain sensitivityIn this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Smith et al. [5] investigated the effect of two different types of exercises on pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) in 21 subjects with chronic whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) and in 19 pain-free controls. PPT at the neck and leg were recorded before and after isometric (3 min wall squat; leg muscle contraction without joint http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Exercising non-painful muscles can induce hypoalgesia in individuals with chronic pain

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.12.005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1What is exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH)?Almost 40 years ago, Black et al. [1] published the first article on the effect of physical exercise on pain sensitivity in humans illustrating that a period of running significantly reduced the pain sensitivity. This phenomenon also known as ‘exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH)’ is now well established in pain-free subjects, and it is typically demonstrated as reduced pain sensitivity in response to exercise [2]. Recently, the influence of different types of exercises [3] as well as the mechanisms underlying EIH [4] has been investigated. However, the effect of acute exercise on the pain sensitivity in subjects with different chronic pain conditions is still controversial, since both hypoalgesia, as well as no change in pain sensitivity, or even hyperalgesia (i.e. impaired EIH) has been reported following exercise.2Isometric exercise differs from aerobic exercise in effect on pain sensitivityIn this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Smith et al. [5] investigated the effect of two different types of exercises on pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) in 21 subjects with chronic whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) and in 19 pain-free controls. PPT at the neck and leg were recorded before and after isometric (3 min wall squat; leg muscle contraction without joint

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Dec 29, 2017

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