Evaluation of the quality of CT images acquired with smart metal artifact reduction software

Evaluation of the quality of CT images acquired with smart metal artifact reduction software AbstractObjectiveTo evaluate the practical effectiveness of smart metal artifact reduction (SMAR) in reducing artifacts caused by metallic implants.MethodsPatients with metal implants underwent computed tomography (CT) examinations on high definition CT scanner, and the data were reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) with value weighted to 40% and smart metal artifact reduction (SMAR) technology. The comparison was assessed by both subjective and objective assessment between the two groups of images. In terms of subjective assessment, three radiologists evaluated image quality and assigned a score for visualization of anatomic structures in the critical areas of interest. Objectively, the absolute CT value of the difference (ΔCT) and artifacts index (AI) were adopted in this study for the quantitative assessment of metal artifacts.ResultsIn subjective image quality assessment, three radiologists scored SMAR images higher than 40% ASiR images (P<0.01) and the result suggested that visualization of critical anatomic structures around the region of the metal object was significantly improved by using SMAR compared with 40% ASiR. The ΔCT and AI for quantitative assessment of metal artifacts showed that SMAR appeared to be superior for reducing metal artifacts (P<0.05) and indicated that this technical approach was more effective in improving the quality of CT images.ConclusionA variety of hardware (dental filling, embolization coil, instrumented spine, hip implant, knee implant) are processed with the SMAR algorithm to demonstrate good recovery of soft tissue around the metal. This artifact reduction allows for the clearer visualization of structures hidden underneath. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Open Life Sciences de Gruyter

Evaluation of the quality of CT images acquired with smart metal artifact reduction software

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Publisher
De Gruyter Open
Copyright
© 2018 Peng Zhou et al.
ISSN
2391-5412
eISSN
2391-5412
D.O.I.
10.1515/biol-2018-0021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractObjectiveTo evaluate the practical effectiveness of smart metal artifact reduction (SMAR) in reducing artifacts caused by metallic implants.MethodsPatients with metal implants underwent computed tomography (CT) examinations on high definition CT scanner, and the data were reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) with value weighted to 40% and smart metal artifact reduction (SMAR) technology. The comparison was assessed by both subjective and objective assessment between the two groups of images. In terms of subjective assessment, three radiologists evaluated image quality and assigned a score for visualization of anatomic structures in the critical areas of interest. Objectively, the absolute CT value of the difference (ΔCT) and artifacts index (AI) were adopted in this study for the quantitative assessment of metal artifacts.ResultsIn subjective image quality assessment, three radiologists scored SMAR images higher than 40% ASiR images (P<0.01) and the result suggested that visualization of critical anatomic structures around the region of the metal object was significantly improved by using SMAR compared with 40% ASiR. The ΔCT and AI for quantitative assessment of metal artifacts showed that SMAR appeared to be superior for reducing metal artifacts (P<0.05) and indicated that this technical approach was more effective in improving the quality of CT images.ConclusionA variety of hardware (dental filling, embolization coil, instrumented spine, hip implant, knee implant) are processed with the SMAR algorithm to demonstrate good recovery of soft tissue around the metal. This artifact reduction allows for the clearer visualization of structures hidden underneath.

Journal

Open Life Sciencesde Gruyter

Published: May 18, 2018

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