Evaluation of spinal interventions in a single doctor private practice in Sweden

Evaluation of spinal interventions in a single doctor private practice in Sweden AbstractAimsTo evaluate the effect of spinal interventions following ISIS guidelines [1].MethodsData from all patients from April 2012 until February 2014 have been registered and followed up after 4–6 months. Patients were mainly referred from surgeons at the regional hospitals. Employment status, medication, VAS, EQ-5D-5L, EQ-VAS and pain reduction were gathered before and at the follow-up. Only patients receiving any kind of treatment were included.ResultsSo far 419/823 patients have been followed-up. Here we present levels of medication and total pain reduction for all patients and, separately, for patients treated with radio frequency facet joint medial branch neurotomy (n = 76).Opioids were reduced from 33% to 26% and no use of analgesics increased from 15% to 31% (p < 0.0159). Opioids in the RF group fell from 31% to 21%, and no use went from 2% to 31%. Of all the patients, 46% had pain reduction >50% and 9% were pain free. In the RF group the figures were 57% and 11%, respectively. No one in the RF group got worse.ConclusionIt is important to follow-up your results, even if complete scientific RCT rigour cannot be upheld Our stringent, long-term follow-up can presumably deliver reasonably reliable effect information, a majority of our patients have reduced their medication significantly (p < 0.001) and more than 50% experience a greater than 50% pain reduction, indicating a significant effect. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Evaluation of spinal interventions in a single doctor private practice in Sweden

Loading next page...
 
/lp/degruyter/evaluation-of-spinal-interventions-in-a-single-doctor-private-practice-Dh0BCAtAuv
Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
© 2014 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2014.05.021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractAimsTo evaluate the effect of spinal interventions following ISIS guidelines [1].MethodsData from all patients from April 2012 until February 2014 have been registered and followed up after 4–6 months. Patients were mainly referred from surgeons at the regional hospitals. Employment status, medication, VAS, EQ-5D-5L, EQ-VAS and pain reduction were gathered before and at the follow-up. Only patients receiving any kind of treatment were included.ResultsSo far 419/823 patients have been followed-up. Here we present levels of medication and total pain reduction for all patients and, separately, for patients treated with radio frequency facet joint medial branch neurotomy (n = 76).Opioids were reduced from 33% to 26% and no use of analgesics increased from 15% to 31% (p < 0.0159). Opioids in the RF group fell from 31% to 21%, and no use went from 2% to 31%. Of all the patients, 46% had pain reduction >50% and 9% were pain free. In the RF group the figures were 57% and 11%, respectively. No one in the RF group got worse.ConclusionIt is important to follow-up your results, even if complete scientific RCT rigour cannot be upheld Our stringent, long-term follow-up can presumably deliver reasonably reliable effect information, a majority of our patients have reduced their medication significantly (p < 0.001) and more than 50% experience a greater than 50% pain reduction, indicating a significant effect.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Jul 1, 2014

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off