Elevation of creatine kinase is linked to disease severity and predicts fatal outcomes in H7N9 infection

Elevation of creatine kinase is linked to disease severity and predicts fatal outcomes in H7N9... To the Editor,A novel avian-origin influenza A (H7N9) virus had emerged and spread among humans in China and led to 720 cases by March 31, 2016, with a mortality rate as high as 40.97% [1], [2]. Among these patients, more than 70% developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which was associated with high mortality, because few interventions were available. Creatine kinase (CK) has been widely used in the diagnosis of diseases such as rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury (AKI), and myocardial injury [3], [4], [5]. Many reports have found that the CK levels of most H7N9-infected patients increased significantly [2], [6], [7]. However, the relationship between elevated CK levels and clinical prognosis in H7N9-infected patients has not been reported.In the study, we assessed whether an increased CK level was related to worse global, renal, heart, and respiratory outcomes in critically ill patients with H7N9 infection and whether CK could serve as a biomarker of severity.Between April 2013 and March 2016, we recruited 130 H7N9-infected patients, 79 H1N1-infected patients, and 71 healthy volunteers from the First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University. The characteristics of the study subjects are shown in Supplemental Table S1. The laboratory confirmation of H7N9 virus http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) de Gruyter

Elevation of creatine kinase is linked to disease severity and predicts fatal outcomes in H7N9 infection

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Publisher
De Gruyter
Copyright
©2017 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston
ISSN
1437-4331
eISSN
1437-4331
D.O.I.
10.1515/cclm-2016-0741
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor,A novel avian-origin influenza A (H7N9) virus had emerged and spread among humans in China and led to 720 cases by March 31, 2016, with a mortality rate as high as 40.97% [1], [2]. Among these patients, more than 70% developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which was associated with high mortality, because few interventions were available. Creatine kinase (CK) has been widely used in the diagnosis of diseases such as rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury (AKI), and myocardial injury [3], [4], [5]. Many reports have found that the CK levels of most H7N9-infected patients increased significantly [2], [6], [7]. However, the relationship between elevated CK levels and clinical prognosis in H7N9-infected patients has not been reported.In the study, we assessed whether an increased CK level was related to worse global, renal, heart, and respiratory outcomes in critically ill patients with H7N9 infection and whether CK could serve as a biomarker of severity.Between April 2013 and March 2016, we recruited 130 H7N9-infected patients, 79 H1N1-infected patients, and 71 healthy volunteers from the First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University. The characteristics of the study subjects are shown in Supplemental Table S1. The laboratory confirmation of H7N9 virus

Journal

Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)de Gruyter

Published: Jul 26, 2017

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