Effect of conditioned pain modulation on long-term potentiation-like pain amplification in humans

Effect of conditioned pain modulation on long-term potentiation-like pain amplification in humans 124Abstracts / Scandinavian Journal of Pain 12 (2016) 117–124in connection with the first pneumococcal vaccination at threemonths of age in child healthcare.Method: The study included 72 children who, at three monthsof age received their first pneumococcal vaccine (Prevenar 13® ).The children were randomized, 36 children received pneumococcalvaccination with placebo cream and the other 36 children receivedthe intervention, Emla® -cream.Result: The result shows that anesthetic cream Emla® significantly reduces pain when FLACC is used as a pain assessment tooland the children begin to cry significantly later than children whoreceived placebo cream. An interesting secondary finding of thestudy was that the younger the child was the stronger was thereaction to pain.Conclusion: The infant needs to be treated as an autonomousindividual with full integrity. We recommend Emla® to be usedand applied in vaccination when the children are three-, five- andtwelve months.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.021Use of Complimentary/Alternative therapy forchronic painThorbjörg Jonsdottir a,∗ , Helga Jonsdottir b ,Sigridur Gunnarsdottir b,caUniversity of Akureyri, Akureyri, IcelandUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavik, Icelandc Landspitali, The National University Hospital ofIceland, IcelandE-mail address: thorbj@unak.is (T. Jonsdottir).bAims: To investigate the use of Complimentary/Alternative therapy for chronic pain in nationwide sample.Methods: In this cross-sectional study a postal questionnairemeasuring socio-demographic variables (e.g. gender, education,income and residence), pain characteristics (severity and interference with daily life), health related quality of life and useof Complimentary/Alternative therapy for chronic pain, was sentto a sample of 4500 individuals randomly drawn from thenational population of Iceland. The relationships between sociodemographic and pain related variables and pain related useComplimentary/Alternative therapy among participants reportingchronic pain (≥3 months) were tested.Results: The prevalence of chronic pain (≥3 months) among respondents was 47.5%. Among participants reporting chronic pain,45.5% (n = 343) reported having consulted some kind of Complimentary or Alternative therapy for their pain the previoussix months and this was more prevalent among women thanmen. Most usual kind of therapists consulted was Acupuncturists(21.4%) and Chiropractors (18.3%). There were some gender differences in what kind of therapy people had consulted. Womenwere more likely than men to have consulted Acupuncturist whilemen consulted a Chiropractor more often than women. Logisticregression analysis showed that predictors for use of Complimentary/Alternative therapy for chronic pain were gender, urbanresidence and pain severity. The use of Complimentary/Alternativetherapy was not related to education, family income or health related quality of life.Conclusions: Women and urban residents are more likelythan men and rural residents to seek Complimentary/Alternativetherapy for chronic. People are more likely to seek Complimentary/Alternative care for chronic pain the more severe pain is.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.022Effect of conditioned pain modulation onlong-term potentiation-like pain amplificationin humansWeiwei Xia a,∗ , Carsten Dahl Mørch a , DagfinnMatre b , Ole Kæseler Andersen aCenter for Neuroplasticity and Pain (CNAP), SMI® ,Department of Health Science and Technology,Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmarkb National Institute of Occupational Health,Department of Work Psychology and Physiology,Oslo, NorwayE-mail address: wx@hst.aau.dk (W. Xia).aAim: The current study aimed to explore the effect of conditioned pain modulation (CPM) on the long-term potentiation(LTP)-like pain amplification induced by peripheral 10 Hz conditioning electrical stimulation (CES).Methods: Sensory changes and neurogenic inflammatory vascular reactions induced by 10 Hz CES were assessed in twentysubjects in a randomized crossover design involving two experimental days separated by at least one week. The CPM effect wasactivated by cold pressor test (CPT) (4 ◦ C) which was applied immediately before the 10 Hz CES in the active session and 32 ◦ C waterwas used in the control session. Perceptual intensity ratings to single electrical stimulation (SES) at the conditioned skin site andto mechanical stimuli (pinprick and light stroking) in the immediate vicinity of the electrode for CES were recorded. Superficialblood flow (SBF), skin temperature (ST), and heat pain threshold(HPT) were also measured. The pain intensities during the CES process were recorded and the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire(SF-MPQ) was used for assessing the pain experience.Results: CPT reduced the pain perception increments to pinprick (12.8 g) and light stroking stimuli after 10 Hz CES comparedto the control session. Moreover, CPT resulted in lower pain intensity ratings during the CES process but without significant changesin the SF-MPQ scores between the two sessions. The SBF and STwere found to increase after CES and then gradually decline butwithout differences between the CPT and the control sessions. NoCPM effect was found for HPT and pain intensity increments to SES.Conclusions: The cold pressor test inhibited heterotopicperception amplification to mechanical stimuli after conditioning electrical stimulation. The results indicate that endogenousdescending inhibitory systems may affect pain-amplificatorymechanisms.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.023 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Effect of conditioned pain modulation on long-term potentiation-like pain amplification in humans

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de Gruyter
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© 2016 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
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1877-8860
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1877-8879
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10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.023
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Abstract

124Abstracts / Scandinavian Journal of Pain 12 (2016) 117–124in connection with the first pneumococcal vaccination at threemonths of age in child healthcare.Method: The study included 72 children who, at three monthsof age received their first pneumococcal vaccine (Prevenar 13® ).The children were randomized, 36 children received pneumococcalvaccination with placebo cream and the other 36 children receivedthe intervention, Emla® -cream.Result: The result shows that anesthetic cream Emla® significantly reduces pain when FLACC is used as a pain assessment tooland the children begin to cry significantly later than children whoreceived placebo cream. An interesting secondary finding of thestudy was that the younger the child was the stronger was thereaction to pain.Conclusion: The infant needs to be treated as an autonomousindividual with full integrity. We recommend Emla® to be usedand applied in vaccination when the children are three-, five- andtwelve months.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.021Use of Complimentary/Alternative therapy forchronic painThorbjörg Jonsdottir a,∗ , Helga Jonsdottir b ,Sigridur Gunnarsdottir b,caUniversity of Akureyri, Akureyri, IcelandUniversity of Iceland, Reykjavik, Icelandc Landspitali, The National University Hospital ofIceland, IcelandE-mail address: thorbj@unak.is (T. Jonsdottir).bAims: To investigate the use of Complimentary/Alternative therapy for chronic pain in nationwide sample.Methods: In this cross-sectional study a postal questionnairemeasuring socio-demographic variables (e.g. gender, education,income and residence), pain characteristics (severity and interference with daily life), health related quality of life and useof Complimentary/Alternative therapy for chronic pain, was sentto a sample of 4500 individuals randomly drawn from thenational population of Iceland. The relationships between sociodemographic and pain related variables and pain related useComplimentary/Alternative therapy among participants reportingchronic pain (≥3 months) were tested.Results: The prevalence of chronic pain (≥3 months) among respondents was 47.5%. Among participants reporting chronic pain,45.5% (n = 343) reported having consulted some kind of Complimentary or Alternative therapy for their pain the previoussix months and this was more prevalent among women thanmen. Most usual kind of therapists consulted was Acupuncturists(21.4%) and Chiropractors (18.3%). There were some gender differences in what kind of therapy people had consulted. Womenwere more likely than men to have consulted Acupuncturist whilemen consulted a Chiropractor more often than women. Logisticregression analysis showed that predictors for use of Complimentary/Alternative therapy for chronic pain were gender, urbanresidence and pain severity. The use of Complimentary/Alternativetherapy was not related to education, family income or health related quality of life.Conclusions: Women and urban residents are more likelythan men and rural residents to seek Complimentary/Alternativetherapy for chronic. People are more likely to seek Complimentary/Alternative care for chronic pain the more severe pain is.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.022Effect of conditioned pain modulation onlong-term potentiation-like pain amplificationin humansWeiwei Xia a,∗ , Carsten Dahl Mørch a , DagfinnMatre b , Ole Kæseler Andersen aCenter for Neuroplasticity and Pain (CNAP), SMI® ,Department of Health Science and Technology,Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmarkb National Institute of Occupational Health,Department of Work Psychology and Physiology,Oslo, NorwayE-mail address: wx@hst.aau.dk (W. Xia).aAim: The current study aimed to explore the effect of conditioned pain modulation (CPM) on the long-term potentiation(LTP)-like pain amplification induced by peripheral 10 Hz conditioning electrical stimulation (CES).Methods: Sensory changes and neurogenic inflammatory vascular reactions induced by 10 Hz CES were assessed in twentysubjects in a randomized crossover design involving two experimental days separated by at least one week. The CPM effect wasactivated by cold pressor test (CPT) (4 ◦ C) which was applied immediately before the 10 Hz CES in the active session and 32 ◦ C waterwas used in the control session. Perceptual intensity ratings to single electrical stimulation (SES) at the conditioned skin site andto mechanical stimuli (pinprick and light stroking) in the immediate vicinity of the electrode for CES were recorded. Superficialblood flow (SBF), skin temperature (ST), and heat pain threshold(HPT) were also measured. The pain intensities during the CES process were recorded and the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire(SF-MPQ) was used for assessing the pain experience.Results: CPT reduced the pain perception increments to pinprick (12.8 g) and light stroking stimuli after 10 Hz CES comparedto the control session. Moreover, CPT resulted in lower pain intensity ratings during the CES process but without significant changesin the SF-MPQ scores between the two sessions. The SBF and STwere found to increase after CES and then gradually decline butwithout differences between the CPT and the control sessions. NoCPM effect was found for HPT and pain intensity increments to SES.Conclusions: The cold pressor test inhibited heterotopicperception amplification to mechanical stimuli after conditioning electrical stimulation. The results indicate that endogenousdescending inhibitory systems may affect pain-amplificatorymechanisms.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjpain.2016.05.023

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Jul 1, 2016

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