Education of nurses and medical doctors is a sine qua non for improving pain management of hospitalized patients, but not enough

Education of nurses and medical doctors is a sine qua non for improving pain management of... In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Kristian Dahl Friesgaard, Charlotte Paltved, and Lone Nikolajsen from Aarhus, Denmark, report on their study evaluating effects of an educational intervention on acute pain in the emergency department [1]. Lars Sturesson and co-workers studied the effect of making mandatory nurses’ documentation of how they evaluate pain and how they manage pain in the emergency department of a Stockholm Hospital [2,3]. Viveke Andersson and her co-workers established an Acute Pain Service that take care of patients also in the medical wards, not only surgical wards, in the major hospitals in Gothenburg, Sweden [4,5]. Kristiina Heikkilä and co-workers in Finland focused on the often insufficient documentation of pain and pain management in hospitals [6].1Improving in-hospital pain management is not difficult, but requires motivated, well-trained nurses and physicians with some extra resourcesMore than 20 years ago, during my sabbatical at Inselspital University Hospital in Berne, Switzerland, in Professor Dick Thomson’s Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, I helped introduce and implement a hospital wide improvement of acute pain management with focus on patient-controlled IV analgesia (PCA) and epidural analgesia on the surgical wards [7]. I realized that for that to be possible with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Pain de Gruyter

Education of nurses and medical doctors is a sine qua non for improving pain management of hospitalized patients, but not enough

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
© 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain
ISSN
1877-8860
eISSN
1877-8879
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.sjpain.2017.02.001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of the Scandinavian Journal of Pain, Kristian Dahl Friesgaard, Charlotte Paltved, and Lone Nikolajsen from Aarhus, Denmark, report on their study evaluating effects of an educational intervention on acute pain in the emergency department [1]. Lars Sturesson and co-workers studied the effect of making mandatory nurses’ documentation of how they evaluate pain and how they manage pain in the emergency department of a Stockholm Hospital [2,3]. Viveke Andersson and her co-workers established an Acute Pain Service that take care of patients also in the medical wards, not only surgical wards, in the major hospitals in Gothenburg, Sweden [4,5]. Kristiina Heikkilä and co-workers in Finland focused on the often insufficient documentation of pain and pain management in hospitals [6].1Improving in-hospital pain management is not difficult, but requires motivated, well-trained nurses and physicians with some extra resourcesMore than 20 years ago, during my sabbatical at Inselspital University Hospital in Berne, Switzerland, in Professor Dick Thomson’s Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, I helped introduce and implement a hospital wide improvement of acute pain management with focus on patient-controlled IV analgesia (PCA) and epidural analgesia on the surgical wards [7]. I realized that for that to be possible with

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Painde Gruyter

Published: Apr 1, 2017

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